nod

Wardrobes

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Just thought I’d share this with you

Ive been fitting three sets of wardrobes Very quick and easy way to do 

and quite inexpensive compared to conventional wardrobe 

I’ve just a piece of oak trim to add to the top and inset handles 

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@nod where did you get the parts from? I'm probably going to have to make up a replacement built-in wardrobe in the next few months and I live not far from you.

Thanks

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Just now, DavidFrancis said:

@nod where did you get the parts from? I'm probably going to have to make up a replacement built-in wardrobe in the next few months and I live not far from you.

Thanks

I purchased the runners from Slingers of Preston 

 

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1 hour ago, DavidFrancis said:

Thanks @nod What about the doors themselves - and even the metal framing?

The doors I bought from Benckmark. We bought 22 on account Was given a price and I made them an offer for a now purchase 

Worked out about £65 each +

and are the very hevy type 

 

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3 minutes ago, recoveringacademic said:

Gary, you seem to be using a lot of metal carcassing : tell us why.....

 

 

That's just how the professionals do stud walling. Gives you thinner walls than in timber.

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I like the "out of the box" thinking there.

 

When I have done built in wardrobes with sliding doors, I have always taken the timber door frame down the sides and finished off with architrave.  I would never have thought of just having the door sliding up to the plasterboarded end of a wall, but I like the simple look now I see it.  Let us know how durable it proves to be.

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11 minutes ago, recoveringacademic said:

Gary, you seem to be using a lot of metal carcassing : tell us why.....

 

Yes Ian Personal preference 

I use it everyday 

I’ve only a few studs upstairs Mainly making bathrooms up and wardrobes 

Ive lines all with ply and soundblock and doubled the walls with a 100 mil void between the two unsuits Very solid

 

main advantages millimetre plumb

easy to keep square 

holes Pre cut for services 

Much better soundproofing than timber 

Same cost as timber to purchase 

Five times as fast to install

 

Pictured is a small job I did on a school a couple of months back 

Build corridor Four classrooms soundblock insulate and skim 

To be completed in five days Over half term 

Two days for two of us to build and board with electrician working with us Day and a half for two of us to skim 

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8 minutes ago, ProDave said:

I like the "out of the box" thinking there.

 

When I have done built in wardrobes with sliding doors, I have always taken the timber door frame down the sides and finished off with architrave.  I would never have thought of just having the door sliding up to the plasterboarded end of a wall, but I like the simple look now I see it.  Let us know how durable it proves to be.

Ive done it like that in the past Dave 

It was my wife’s idea to not have a frame or Arks 

It should be pretty durable as there is little or no weight on the frame 

It’s all on the wheels 

I even put an upstanding of ply at the back of the head in case we decided to hand from the back

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Just now, nod said:

Ive done it like that in the past Dave 

It was my wife’s idea to not have a frame or Arks 

It should be pretty durable as there is little or no weight on the frame 

It’s all on the wheels 

I even put an upstanding of ply at the back of the head in case we decided to hand from the back

Just looking at the photo 

I added door timbers should things not work out and I ended putting a frame  in 😂

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30 minutes ago, ProDave said:

I like the "out of the box" thinking there.

 

When I have done built in wardrobes with sliding doors, I have always taken the timber door frame down the sides and finished off with architrave.  I would never have thought of just having the door sliding up to the plasterboarded end of a wall, but I like the simple look now I see it.  Let us know how durable it proves to be.

A couple of small bump stops top and bottom would stop the door ever meeting the paint ;) 

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3 minutes ago, Nickfromwales said:

A couple of small bump stops top and bottom would stop the door ever meeting the paint ;) 

Yeah kit comes with two splayeyed bits that fit Ito the track

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Love it, thanks @nod.  I think I've found the way to go with my wardrobe structures.  I presume that lot would fall into a VAT reclaim with no bother, then I'd just need to pay for and install the innards separately as they're non-VAT reclaimable.

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Yes part of our vat claim

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50 minutes ago, vivienz said:

Love it, thanks @nod.  I think I've found the way to go with my wardrobe structures.  I presume that lot would fall into a VAT reclaim with no bother, then I'd just need to pay for and install the innards separately as they're non-VAT reclaimable.

Last time I looked the VAT rules said a built in wardrobe can be frame, doors and 1 basic shelf.  Anything beyond that is not VAT claimable.

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1 hour ago, Nickfromwales said:

A couple of small bump stops top and bottom would stop the door ever meeting the paint ;) 

 

Or sticky nipples from Amazon at 10p each :-). (Admittedly more suitable for where doors open and hit another unit).

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07F5XXCWH/

 

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Edited by Ferdinand

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We have sliding door wardrobes and the end doors have soft close which fits to the top of the door. I can see that @nod is a dab hand with the metal stud!

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Quite like the look of those .

 

Have just been helping a family member recarpet their house, and it involved dismantling and remantling a former flat-pack wardrobe with two full size mirrored doors. Weighed a bleedin' ton. Carpet fitter walked in and said "I'm not doing that" despite it being in the contract; at that point no one has anywhere to sleep so you cannot exactly walk away.

 

I like the multiple sliding doors and zero wardrobe floor that can just be treated as another area to do with floor-covering.

 

Occam says "separate wardrobe floor not needed". Win. 

 

The only reason I can see not to have one is that if it is not built-in pro-developers  would not have to pay for it.

 

Ferdinand

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1 hour ago, ProDave said:

Last time I looked the VAT rules said a built in wardrobe can be frame, doors and 1 basic shelf.  Anything beyond that is not VAT claimable.

 

Criteria for eligible Wardrobes from VAT Notice 708 is below:

 

Basic wardrobes installed on their own with all the following characteristics:

 

  • the wardrobe encloses a space bordered by the walls, ceiling and floor. But units whose design includes, for example, an element to bridge over a bed or create a dressing table are furniture and are not building materials
  • the side and back use three walls of the room (such as across the end of a wall), or two walls and a stub wall. But wardrobes installed in the corner of a room where one side is a closing end panel are furniture and are not building materials
  • on opening the wardrobe you should see the walls of the building. These would normally be either bare plaster or painted plaster. Wardrobes that contain internal panelling, typically as part of a modular or carcass system, are furniture and are not building materials
  • The wardrobe should feature no more than a single shelf running the full length of the wardrobe, a rail for hanging clothes and a closing door or doors. Wardrobes with internal divisions, drawers, shoe racks or other features are furniture and are not building materials.

 

Of course you can just claim for the bits that make up an allowable structure and add the internals later. The thing they will disallow is buying a wardrobe as flat pack even if you said you were only using the doors and did away with the sides etc (someone apparently tried to argue this case). I haven't actually altered mine. I find the shelf and hanging rail work just fine as I have lots of other drawers etc elsewhere to use. Actually that's not quite true as I have 2 hanging rails in a couple of the wardrobes as I only need one to take full length clothes. 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, newhome said:

Of course you can just claim for the bits that make up an allowable structure and add the internals later. The thing they will disallow is buying a wardrobe as flat pack even if you said you were only using the doors and did away with the sides etc (someone apparently tried to argue this case). I haven't actually altered mine. I find the shelf and hanging rail work just fine as I have lots of other drawers etc elsewhere to use. Actually that's not quite true as I have 2 hanging rails in a couple of the wardrobes as I only need one to take full length clothes. 

 

That is my plan. The doors, door runners, frames, plasterboard all on the VAT claim. The internal racking / shelving is "furniture" and not on the VAT claim.

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In our 2nd & 3rd bedrooms we used cheap as chips Howdens sliders and they are surprisingly good...I wanted a big mirror door too as smaller bedrooms so mirror good for bouncing the light but you can have any configuration of solid/mirror.  I chose Oak finish to blend with our interior doors.  We just built an extra bit of stud wall to create the alcove.  No architraves clean line to plaster edge and floor runners are glued down to tiles so floor runs underneath.  Carpenter made a good heavy weight shelf and we fitted rails under that.  Even weight of my stuff is not going to make that collapse!  Will fit out the other bits as and when, what we have done is vat reclaimable....I hope so anyway its gone in for the claim. 

 

I thought they would just be a stop gap solution but they look really good and very capacious.

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@lizzie What are those howdens wardrobe doors actually like?

 

Reading the caralogue, says "8mm paper faced chipboard"  It's the "paper faced" not even veneer bit that makes me think they might be rubbish and a poor relation to the real oak doors in the rest of the house.

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@ProDave that was my though too which is why when i needed something pdq and cheap I thought they would be a temp option.  They may well be temp and we will use runners for alternative doors in time but at the mo I am impressed at how good they are for the money, they dont scream paper chipboard near real oak they work ok.  Far better than I thought.  If you need a budget option for a few years I would go for these.

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