joe90

Tiling a conservatory floor

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Posted (edited)

Our new conservatory will be fitted in a few weeks, then the builder will be screeding  over 200mm of insulation . After reading other threads on tiling, de coupling mats etc etc is there anything special I should do for this floor as it will cool overnight and be cold in the winter as it has no heating but will get warm (hot) in the summer due to facing South (solar glass is being installed in the roof to hopefully negate over heating).? I was thinking of a floor tile that was not too light in colour so it would absorb heat during the day to make evening temps warm!

 

P.S. it will be 10m by 2.3m.

Edited by joe90
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How about use a thickish limestone or slate instead to absorb heat ..?

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4 minutes ago, PeterW said:

How about use a thickish limestone or slate instead to absorb heat ..?

 

I don’t like slate much as it scratches easily (and our conservatory is also our back door, dogs etc) I like porcelain as it’s bullet proof and I am hoping because it’s glued to a concrete screed it will absorb some heat.  My question is more about gluing methods etc to avoid problems ( my kitchen floor has a few tiles that sound hollow but I have fitted the kitchen/skirting so I am loathed to disturb it).

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My porcelain tiles in my sunroom really absorb the heat. They are 600*600 and the area surrounding the door and big window gets pretty warm if the sun is shining on it all day. I just used a flexible adhesive to glue them down and 4 years later they haven't moved yet.

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18 minutes ago, Declan52 said:

My porcelain tiles in my sunroom really absorb the heat. They are 600*600 and the area surrounding the door and big window gets pretty warm if the sun is shining on it all day. I just used a flexible adhesive to glue them down and 4 years later they haven't moved yet.

 

Glad you called it a sunroom, it’s what I meant (as I hate usual conservatories). Thanks for that Declan.

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 O need for matting As Declan says Porcelin are great all rounder look good don’t mark hold heat and great to cut

Dont forget to seal the floor with 4-1 SBR prior to tiling 

Make sure sunroom floor has dried out prior to tiling 

Sounds a really nice size 

Sourh facing as well 🌞 

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7 minutes ago, nod said:

4-1 SBR

 

Great Nod, thanks. Do you mean 4 of water and 1 of SBR.?

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24 minutes ago, nod said:

 O need for matting As Declan says Porcelin are great all rounder look good don’t mark hold heat and great to cut

Dont forget to seal the floor with 4-1 SBR prior to tiling 

Make sure sunroom floor has dried out prior to tiling 

Sounds a really nice size 

Sourh facing as well 🌞 

They don't mark but with the sun shining on them you can see every minute piece of dirt. Reckon mine won't see this date next year!!

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2 hours ago, joe90 said:

 

Great Nod, thanks. Do you mean 4 of water and 1 of SBR.?

Yes for water 

Don’t forget to back butter your floor tiles

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2 hours ago, nod said:

Yes for water 

Don’t forget to back butter your floor tiles

+1. 

If it's not bed n butter then expect them to come back up by themselves. 

No need for matting, don't waste your money. Make 100% sure you do not grout to the wall so there's available expansion in the whole tiled area 👍 

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Here is where the sunroom will go. Will post pic of completion

9161E13C-6474-4533-98CE-B518C16D20A1.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Nickfromwales said:

+1. 

If it's not bed n butter then expect them to come back up by themselves. 

No need for matting, don't waste your money. Make 100% sure you do not grout to the wall so there's available expansion in the whole tiled area 👍 

 

You're scaring me now as I didn't butter the wet room corner tiles! :(

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41 minutes ago, Onoff said:

 

You're scaring me now as I didn't butter the wet room corner tiles! :(

With the amount of tanking you did you could get away without grout ;) 

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Just found this on the web 

 

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So if you back butter the tile you use the FLAT edge of the trowel?

 

I used the notched edge on the floor then again the notched to back butter the tile but at 90to the floor.

 

???

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Ditto here.  Can see an issue - just end up with a slightly thicker bed.

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21 hours ago, Onoff said:

So if you back butter the tile you use the FLAT edge of the trowel?

 

I used the notched edge on the floor then again the notched to back butter the tile but at 90to the floor.

 

???

I use two different methods, dependant on the quality of the slab. One is to put a 10mm notch on the floor and butter the back of the tile with the flat edge of the trowel ( for good floors which don't need too much smoothing ) and the second is where I put a 10mm notch on both the tile and the floor and then I can either leave them sitting up or squash them down a bit if there are highs and lows to traverse. Did that over a rough concrete slab in a kitchen extension where Magnet had fitted tiles for a £30k kitchen, and my tiling in the small extension made the customer do a double take as the "showroom" ( LOL ) fitters tiling was shocking. 

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The screed in our sunspace is going down on Friday, builder is putting edge insulation round it and an expansion joint in the middle to cope with temp differences, I can then tile from that expansion gap either way. Glass going in today 😀.

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