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How wide are your doors?

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I’ve just noticed that there are no door sizes on the architects or building control drawings? Our current cabin accommodation has 30inch wide doors. What size door should i be going for given we are getting older and this is our forever home?

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All entry level doors that go from the front door to the WC on that floor have a minimum 838mm width requirement to meet Part M

 

TBH I think 838 vs 762 doors look much nicer and aren't any more expensive.

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We used 838mm everywhere - As Peter says they look better and give you the option of getting a wheel chair through if needed.

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We have allowed for 926mm but we can easily cut that to 838 if required later.

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I had 2ft 9in down stairs and 2ft 6in upstairs (I still deal in old money ?).

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We installed minimum 926mm wide on the  Ground Floor, with some of the rooms having double doors =  main entrance, lounge, dining room and kitchen.  Principally for wheel chair access but we wanted  good size doors  our design  and "look".

 

The 1st and 2nd Floor doors are mainly 826mm wide for main bedrooms with some 716mm wide for ensuite  bath and shower room..

 

All the doors are  2040mm  high.

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all internal 838 wide doors, I’m single storey. This wide to cater for poss wheelchair in future.  I have only one door in my living area and that is kitchen to utility all other doors are bedroom/bathroom doors.  I have an open square arch to my snug which has been sized to take double doors in the future if ever we felt the need. I have no thresholds or steps internally and all level thresholds at external doors again to future proof. I would go as wide as you can without compromising your wall space or your overall look.

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On the subject of doors, @lizzie you've also got those rather lovely magnetic door latches. I liked those. Nothing protrudes from the door.

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All our door openings were 1000mm, so slightly smaller doors, there were a few smaller ones (children's en-suites) cupboard under the stairs, plant room as smaller ones were required.  The door opening to the garage and front door was 1200mm.

 

My mother is in a wheel chair so default to large.  Large doors look so much better.

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Most of the doors downstairs are double doors (1650) but the few that aren't are 838. All single doors upstairs also 838. 

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While on this subject would I be correcting in thinking that corridor width is critical on the approach to an m-spec door? There is one smaller minimum for a head-on approach to a door but if there is a turn the corridor must be wider. 

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What's the standard largest single front door you can have, is it 1200?

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11 hours ago, epsilonGreedy said:

While on this subject would I be correcting in thinking that corridor width is critical on the approach to an m-spec door? There is one smaller minimum for a head-on approach to a door but if there is a turn the corridor must be wider. 

 

Yes - all in Part M. 

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Interesting. I've blogged about non-standard door-sets, because, as some respondents have pointed out, they can and do look better, especially as a pair and part-glazed. I noted, in the blog, a trend, way back when, taller doors too were employed, especially with higher ceilings, Georgian and Regency scale... all part of the proportion game, if you want to be fussy and add character, and plainly if the budget can stretch to it. Pocket doors can save space too. I think in Edwardian times, M H Baillie-Scott and later Frank Lloyd Wright certainly employed such devices to make their houses seem larger.   

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48 minutes ago, caliwag said:

Interesting. I've blogged about non-standard door-sets, because, as some respondents have pointed out, they can and do look better, especially as a pair and part-glazed. I noted, in the blog, a trend, way back when, taller doors too were employed, especially with higher ceilings, Georgian and Regency scale... all part of the proportion game, if you want to be fussy and add character, and plainly if the budget can stretch to it. Pocket doors can save space too. I think in Edwardian times, M H Baillie-Scott and later Frank Lloyd Wright certainly employed such devices to make their houses seem larger.   

I wanted pocket doors, unfortunately they have gone the way of most of my wants

 

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12 minutes ago, Hecateh said:

I wanted pocket doors, unfortunately they have gone the way of most of my wants

 

I have a pocket door on my w.c. because of space constraints.  I'm glad I dropped the one on the bathroom I think they are over hyped.  I would only use where space dictated. They are expensive and a bit of a faff to fit and you lose the soundproofing in the wall as its hollow to accommodate the door.

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10 minutes ago, lizzie said:

I have a pocket door on my w.c. because of space constraints.  I'm glad I dropped the one on the bathroom I think they are over hyped.  I would only use where space dictated. They are expensive and a bit of a faff to fit and you lose the soundproofing in the wall as its hollow to accommodate the door.

 

The sound aspect is not an issue as I live alone - the expense should have been doable.  Space is and isn't an issue. There is plenty of space for me, but the whole interior space is under 90 sqm so rooms are quite small - doors not encroaching would be a benefit.  The bathroom is still going to be a slider, it's a small room and is the one that requires part M access - it is going to have to be barn door style - thing is I wanted shelves on that wall - will have to work something out so the shelves stand proud as the utility room it is off is small anyway and has to compensate for my current garage and loft.  

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