Ian D

Timber frame or brick & Block

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2 hours ago, Big Jimbo said:

I am currently thinking of whether to build in Block and Block........Timber frame, with external Blockwork......... Or just timber frame, clad up top with Cement Board, and rendered on the Bottom half. I would rather build in just timber. Wood I beams would be great for walls and roof. The biggest problem i have is re-sale. I know that these days insurance can be just the same for standard and non standard construction. I am however concerned that somebody looking to get a mortgage on a house that is considered "Non standard construction" could be limited, and that might put them off buying my house . That and the though that non standard (through perhaps lack of understanding) might put them off altogether. I don't want to limit my end market if i decide to sell and move on.

 

Interesting point, I dunno, when buying houses I can't recall a single time that anyone mentioned explicitly the method either direction in their sales pitches. Never mentioned in e.g. rightmove blurbs etc etc. Perhaps there are a few people obsessed either way, but if any thing I think that once the house actually stands, and assuming (...) that it indeed has succeeded, the results would speak for itself.

 

So yes, if you're worried TF has a larger chance of being 'broken' somehow then perhaps not do it, but once it's proven itself, surely it's fine..

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10 hours ago, puntloos said:

 

Interesting point, I dunno, when buying houses I can't recall a single time that anyone mentioned explicitly the method either direction in their sales pitches. Never mentioned in e.g. rightmove blurbs etc etc. Perhaps there are a few people obsessed either way, but if any thing I think that once the house actually stands, and assuming (...) that it indeed has succeeded, the results would speak for itself.

 

So yes, if you're worried TF has a larger chance of being 'broken' somehow then perhaps not do it, but once it's proven itself, surely it's fine..

As i said i would rather build in timber. I think i will have to speak to some mortgage lenders, and brokers to see how different building methods are viewed.

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O.k I am not saying one way is right.or wrong but these are my thoughts on the way my design is going for a modern rendered flat roofed house.

 

I decided not to go fully timber g8ve the external render, and rendering onto a timber structure just doesn't seem right to me, and in the back of my head have concerns on the potential shinkage of the timber frame and it's effect on the render.

 

That led me to a block external skin, and timber frame internal. This was my preferred option for quite a while. I choose this as you could get u values of about 0.17 with an internal layer of 50mm pir. However the cost was a concern and I am not too concented about getting the frame up in days where block would take week.

 

Thinking about it, I would have the brickies on site anyway for doing the external skin so why not get them on site for longer rather than a separate trade. Also this was coupled with being able to get a u value of 0.17 with a thicker cavity.

 

So in the end I am (currently) going for

 

- rendered 100mm block 

- 150mm full cavity with mineral / glass will (0.032)

- aircrew blocks (0.011)

- dot and dat plaster board.

 

Just my decision process.

 

 

 

 

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On 26/09/2020 at 20:02, puntloos said:

General TF Cons:

Corrections onsite hard/costly

  - IF something is askew onsite, you are in trouble. If the TF design or the slab was shoddy, weird stuff has to be done. 

- Internal Noisiness

   - Not insurmountable, but because TF just has less 'heft' it is easier to move, which means sound travels easier. 

   - As a result, extra hard work needs to be done to make sure the house is quiet.  As I understand it ICF might be the optimal one here, but if I remember correctly it might be hard to find, perhaps with Brexit doubly so? 

Underfloor heating

  - Still not quite sure if this is a myth but some extra care needs to be done to allow the 1st floor be able to even carry the UFH pipes, slabs, waterworks etc.

 

Yes, you can be screwed if your slab is off-spec, but one way to mitigate this is (as we did) to get your slab and TF from the same supplier.  I also did a full dimensions and levels check after the slab was finished and before confirming delivery of the frame.  In our case we had a slump of about 3mm in one room which we decided to accept, but the frame plate base was true and accurate so we were happy to proceed.  IMO, this detailed check is essential.

 

We don't notice intra-floor noise, and a twin-wall frame filled with pumped cellulose filler is amazingly solid.  A friend has a PUR insulated single wall TF; this has a smaller cross-section, but isn't nearly so substantial, IMO.  Between floor noise is more of an issue and we do notice this between my son's bedsit on the top floor and the main guest room below on the 1st floor.  However this is more a consequence of using eco-joists than the TF itself.  This being said, EcoJoists make installing all of the between floor services such a doddle that I would still use them if I were doing this again -  but I would install acoustic decoupling  in the guestroom ceiling.

 

We have a pretty high spec in terms of energy efficiency, so we only have UFH on the ground floor, and non on the top two floors.  In the worst couple of months in the winter, I do run a small 2kW heater a few hours a night in my study / 2nd guestroom with the door ajar and this keeps the hall space at around 21°C.  We prefer the the bedrooms being a degree or 2 cooler.

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