Barney12

Door Sets - What about linings?

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Me again!

 

Im intending to use pre-hung door sets in the house (which ones will ultimately be driven by left over budget!!) .

 

Talking to our plasterer (who I've used before and is good) he said he doesn't need any sacrafficial door linings. I then suggested beads around the door frame so he had something to plaster up to. He said there was no need and they would only cause cracking. 

 

Although i should take him at his word I'm worried that he won't achieve a good finish. I know the edges will be covered by architrave.

 

Am I over thinking things? (Again!!)

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I hope you are over thinking. I am on the verge of getting plastered before the door liners are in (I can't afford the doors and liners at the moment)

 

The plasterer didn't say "oh I can't do it until the door liners are in"

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1 minute ago, ProDave said:

I hope you are over thinking. I am on the verge of getting plastered before the door liners are in (I can't afford the doors and liners at the moment)

 

The plasterer didn't say "oh I can't do it until the door liners are in"

 

Thats good to hear. My plasterer seemed very relaxed. I'm just used to doing things in a particular order. #old skool :) 

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Over thinking. I normally put them in but did a job before Xmas where fitted lining and door same time. Better in some ways as skim dry so no moisture in lining. 

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I had the same problem - you cannot plaster without having either the linings in, or something to give an edge of the right depth for them to plaster to, at least not without ending up with a messy edge.  I ended up in a last minute rush, fixing 15mm stop beads around every door opening, before the house was boarded out.  The plasterboard was then screwed in place, over the big flanges of the stop beads and leaving the edge of the beads proud of the plasterboard by the skim thickness.

 

In hindsight, I think I would have been better fitting 120mm wide temporary linings with screws, as that would almost certainly have given a better edge, and wouldn't have cost a lot more.

Edited by JSHarris

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They can plaster to a free edge though. It didn't look bad on the job I was on. All depends on what your spread wants. Got to keep the guy doing the work happy

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14 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

I had the same problem - you cannot plaster without having either the linings in, or something to give an edge of the right depth for them to plaster to, at least not without ending up with a messy edge. 

In a perfect world you are right. In my imperfect world I simply cannot afford doors and liners now, but need to get on.

 

What do you mean by "messy edge"? The architrave will cover most sins?  As long as he can lay down an even thickness skim I don't see an issue.  If the lack of an "edge" means the skim changes thickness drastically and undulates, then I see a problem but would hope a good spread would get an even thickness coat.

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The plaster skim will tend to taper in thickness at the edges, and may well end up uneven, so you'll probably end up having to fill under the architrave to get it to fit without gaps. 

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2 hours ago, Barney12 said:

Me again!

 

Im intending to use pre-hung door sets in the house (which ones will ultimately be driven by left over budget!!) .

 

Talking to our plasterer (who I've used before and is good) he said he doesn't need any sacrafficial door linings. I then suggested beads around the door frame so he had something to plaster up to. He said there was no need and they would only cause cracking. 

 

Although i should take him at his word I'm worried that he won't achieve a good finish. I know the edges will be covered by architrave.

 

Am I over thinking things? (Again!!)

That's exactly what our guy has done - totally smooth to the edge. No bead or door lining there.  

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I wasnt planning on putting door linings in before skimming.  I just need to make sure the gaps are roughly the correct size - it would be annoying having to add a bit of plasterboard & skimming that afterwards.

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10 hours ago, CC45 said:

I wasnt planning on putting door linings in before skimming.  I just need to make sure the gaps are roughly the correct size - it would be annoying having to add a bit of plasterboard & skimming that afterwards.

That's easy. Choose your door sizes, and allow for door liners each side.  I think my door openings are 10mm bigger than that theoretical size to allow for packers to get it all square, which will be covered by the architrave.

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Through ignorance I bashed on and got everything plastered without lining the door openings first. Can't see any problems with it, certainly the plasterer never commented on having to work to a free edge.

I sized my openings 45mm larger all round to account for linings at about 33mm, which seems to be a standard size, plus some wiggle room for packers. A 76mm architrave should hide everything.

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15 hours ago, Barney12 said:

I then suggested beads around the door frame so he had something to plaster up to. He said there was no need and they would only cause cracking. 

If they're fitted a good 25mm or so past where the architrave ends then how the hell will you see any cracks? Stop beads are designed to be used around existing window reveals and new knock throughs etc so although they do crack and need a bit of after care where it's seen, here they'd be perfect and I'd go for them tbh. They're cheap, you can fit them yourself in minutes, and you'll get a consistent finish all round. 

Plasteres are good at smooth, but not so good at flat / level imho. When you rest a dead straight bit of arc down each point you'll deffo get undulations without a bead. Plasters always tend to put too much at the bottom and less in the middle as it's easier to trowel up when not bent over. I've lost count of how many plasterer have done this for me and I've had to chip away to get the timber work on plumb / flat. :(

Edited by Nickfromwales
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48 minutes ago, Nickfromwales said:

If they're fitted a good 25mm or so past where the architrave ends then how the hell will you see any cracks? Stop beads are designed to be used around existing window reveals and new knock throughs etc so although they do crack and need a bit of after care where it's seen, here they'd be perfect and I'd go for them tbh. They're cheap, you can fit them yourself in minutes, and you'll get a consistent finish all round. 

Plasteres are good at smooth, but not so good at flat / level imho. When you rest a dead straight bit of arc down each point you'll deffo get undulations without a bead. Plasters always tend to put too much at the bottom and less in the middle as it's easier to trowel up when not bent over. I've lost count of how many plasterer have done this for me and I've had to chip away to get the timber work on plumb / flat. :(

 

 

Exactly what our plasterers said, and what I did.  The result was that all the architrave sat dead flush to the walls, with no faffing around afterwards.  As I was fitting oiled solid oak architrave, the last thing I wanted to have to do was faff around trying to fill under it to get it to look as if it was sat dead flush with the wall.  Having the beads underneath meant the plasterers could just skim to the flat top edge of the bead, making things consistent at every doorway.

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