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We have a collection of art we have built up since we married (30+ years) we try to only have 'real' art on our walls and we buy it for the 'story' the picture tells us. The new house is somewhat designed to have large wall areas on which we can put parts of the collection. Much of our collection is Scottish contemporary from people like:

 

Alan Watson all kinds of Scottish stories from St Kilda and Fishing, through Whaling to oil rigs and landscapes.

Craig Wright dark themes amazing patterns.

Moira Watson we would have liked a bomb but ended up with a picture - still wonderful.

Kirsty Behrens still a student but producing some fascinating work, 

 

We also have pieces from many other, non Scottish, including:

 

Chris Rose Wildlife artist.

David Penn Landscapes - lake land.

Boris Yeghiazaryan We have an Icon painting but his stories are legend in the Ukraine.

 

If this is too much feel free to 'moderate'

 

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Hmmm..

 

In no particular order :

 

Philip Gray - some original, some prints of landscapes but generally does stuff around the west coast of Ireland

Fabian Perez - Argentinian artist who does dark oil based on his childhood...

Christian Hook - only got one print, should have bought before he won Sky Artist of the Year as the small stuff is £5k plus...

Duncan MacGregor - fantastic boat pictures...

 

Nearly bought a Lowry once..... Wouldn't need the mortgage if I had !

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Duncan is often showing his stuff off at the Driftwood Gallery (formerly Drang).

 

I have a little bit of involvement with the art world.  Last show was a disaster.  Hired a place in St.Ives and the key holder had buggered off.  So locked out.  Wankers.

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We've got all sorts of stuff, including some done by OH.  We've pretty much run out of wall space where we are.

 

In the last couple of years we've bought 2 originals by a French artist based at Saint Briac on the north Brittany coast, Philippe Chatelier.  One of his themes is based around the great French liners of the 1930s and 1940s and this is the style of the ones we have.  The link with Saint Briac is that it was the home town of the captain of the Normandie.

 

Philippe Chatelier, Saint Briac

 

OH is a big rock fan and I bought him a limited edition print of Storm Thorgerson's 'Wake up and Smell the Coffee' at an exhibition of his work (before he died), which is quite an eye catcher as there was no photo-shopping or CGI.  He did many of the Pink Floyd album covers.

 

Storm Thorgerson album covers

 

We've also got quite a lot of stuff bought at local art groups - some of these are very good and incredibly cheap for the work that is in them.

 

There's no definite style to what we like, other than we don't like chocolate box type paintings and we don't buy something because it will match the colour of the sofa.

Edited by vivienz
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3 hours ago, vivienz said:

 and we don't buy something because it will match the colour of the sofa.

 

I was told to buy the art first and match the sofa to that B|

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We went ahead with commissioning a painting with James Bartholomew, a first time experience for us and quite a nervous one.  There's been a wall identified for this painting since I did the original floor plans nearly 4 years ago, and have now just got it hung.

 

Mac.thumb.jpg.cf2f0024eaf2ede5774e61dfd4a920be.jpg

 

http://www.jamesbartholomew.co.uk/

 

The breed of cow (Shorthorn) has a link to the family Farm and wider local area, and we thought quite fitting for our cow-shed conversion.

Closer image of painting:

 

Mac2.thumb.jpg.645a6625aad6ab591b233766ebae1dfd.jpg

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gorgeous

 

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The wife's cousin. Recently found out, that before he died he had a gallery interested in an exhibition. These are a tad "erotica"  but some of his more subtle stuff was stunning and he was offered thousands for them:

 

https://flic.kr/s/aHskbJqL1N

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Landscape and architectural photography is a ‘hobby’ that I started 10 years ago, however it’s now got to the point where I’m better known as a photographer than I am in my day job as an architect.

In case anyone is curious my website is here:

http://www.ianbramham.com

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What a handsome beastie!  Love the dining furniture, too

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On 10/02/2018 at 23:29, Ian said:

Landscape and architectural photography is a ‘hobby’ that I started 10 years ago, however it’s now got to the point where I’m better known as a photographer than I am in my day job as an architect.

In case anyone is curious my website is here:

http://www.ianbramham.com

 

Love the photography.

 

Good on you if you are able to use it towards a good living or to pay for itself, and that people enjoy your work.

 

I knocked around for a few years in the 'creative industries' in Derbyshire, and the overwhelming majority were hobbyists subsidised by partners, or really struggling, or supporting it with a second low paid job. Excellent and admirable love of the craft, but a painful way to try and make a living.

 

Ferdinand

 

Edited by Ferdinand

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1 hour ago, Ferdinand said:

 

Love the photography.

 

Good on you if you are able to use it towards a good living or to pay for itself, and that people enjoy your work.

 

I knocked around for a few years in the 'creative industries' in Derbyshire, and the overwhelming majority were hobbyists subsidised by partners, or really struggling, or supporting it with a second low paid job. Excellent and admirable love of the craft, but a painful way to try and make a living.

 

Ferdinand

 

I'm lucky that I'm in the position where I can afford to keep the photography as something I do in my spare time. It more than pays for itself but I wouldn't like to have to rely on just selling prints to pay the mortgage. From what I've seen most professional landscape photographers make their living from teaching workshops rather than from selling prints of their work.

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20 minutes ago, Ian said:

I'm lucky that I'm in the position where I can afford to keep the photography as something I do in my spare time. It more than pays for itself but I wouldn't like to have to rely on just selling prints to pay the mortgage. From what I've seen most professional landscape photographers make their living from teaching workshops rather than from selling prints of their work.

 

Yep B|.

 

Or you can sell a LOT of greetings cards, or have a studio and gallery and ideally training facility in the right place and print your own prints, or have about 75k-100k pics in commercial photo libraries.

 

I tried vertically integrating photography through to commercial quality printing, but it was too tough for me.

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