NSS

Suddenly, energy efficiency sells....

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... even when it's not really that efficient.

 

Email from Rightmove contained the following from Bellway Homes. Amazing what surging gas prices can provoke.

 

"Visit one of our award-winning developments and you could be living the dream in a beautiful Bellway home next year. New-build homes are often far more energy efficient than older properties, with customers saving on average £629 per year* compared to second hand properties.

On top of this, Bellway customers will be taking advantage of innovations in construction technology, techniques and materials, in order to reduce daily running costs and to help protect the environment."

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Next they will be quoting how much carbon is emitted or embedded but it is unlikely to be a deciding factor in buying a new home. Location, kerb appeal, space, orientation, fittings etc will come before efficiency for most people. Maybe some will consider it, if there was a choice between similar properties but that rarely/never happens in my experience.

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The Bellway boxes I have seen are far from efficient, innovative or environmentally friendly. I can’t see many of them lasting more than 50 years if that, and the amount of remedial works is unbelievable.

sadly ‘joe public’ is gullible and easily persuaded to pay over the odds for sub standard housing.

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3 hours ago, markc said:

The Bellway boxes I have seen are far from efficient, innovative or environmentally friendly. I can’t see many of them lasting more than 50 years if that, and the amount of remedial works is unbelievable.

sadly ‘joe public’ is gullible and easily persuaded to pay over the odds for sub standard housing.

Nor is there any attention to detail in the execution of the installation of things like sheet PIR insulation, as it's installed by site workers who get paid on volume, not detail. Their rates are screwed down too, so no incentive to go "above and beyond" as you often would get from a stand-alone builder / sub-contractor. The public get to buy these after it's too late to inspect the work, or they just don't care enough to ask to. One new build on a site is was on back in the day had the deposit-paid clients turn up mid build, and demand a full refund, as the workmanship was just horrific. The site was full of horror stories which ended up in the local paper. If covered up in time though, how would anyone know........

Edited by Nickfromwales
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My point was that marketing properties on their supposed energy efficiency is something I'd not seen before, even if we all know it's largely BS. 

 

Hopefully, what may in time follow is an 'arms race' of housebuilders trying to outdo each other as to how efficient their homes are, and that could be a good thing.

Edited by NSS

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15 hours ago, NSS said:

...

with customers saving on average £629 per year* compared to second hand properties.

....

 

I wonder, do they publish the fundamental assumptions for that calculation ? Who knows, they might have underestimated the efficiencies.  😒

 

Thought I'd better ask before @SteamyTea blows a fuse.......

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2 minutes ago, ToughButterCup said:

 

I wonder, do they publish the fundamental assumptions for that calculation ? Who knows, they might have underestimated the efficiencies.  😒

 

Thought I'd better ask before @SteamyTea blows a fuse.......

 

It says....

 

*Data taken from a survey undertaken by the Home Builders Federation 

 

... but who knows what they were comparing 🤔 

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If energy eficciency really mattered, then house buyers would be very interested in the EPC rating, would pay more for band A and B houses, and pay a lot less for band F and G to reflect the amount of work they need to bruing them to an acceptable standard.

 

I don't see much evidence of that happening other than perhaps landlords avoiding the worst ones that are too poor to be legally let and not willing to do the work to upgrade them.

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1 hour ago, DamonHD said:

Trust estate agents to find any excuse and way to inflate prices…

brexit doom and gloom … we expect property prices to rise.

a meteor will destroy the earth …. Property prices rising at the fastest rate since 1860.

etc etc etc

 

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On 23/11/2021 at 13:07, ProDave said:

If energy eficciency really mattered, then house buyers would be very interested in the EPC rating, would pay more for band A and B houses, and pay a lot less for band F and G to reflect the amount of work they need to bruing them to an acceptable standard.

 

I don't see much evidence of that happening other than perhaps landlords avoiding the worst ones that are too poor to be legally let and not willing to do the work to upgrade them.

The people who bought our house bought it because it was a PH with EPC A95. There were three people bidding against each other to buy it so I'm sure given the choice buyers would consider low energy housing important, but as the estate agent said it was the first EPC A house they had sold.

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Low energy housing only becomes an issue when energy prices rise dramatically.

 

If I had said in 1974 "I have seen the future of motoring, it weighs over 2 ton and does twelve to the gallon" everyone would have laughed.

There are about 400,000 RangeRovers on the UK roads.

Edited by SteamyTea

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7 minutes ago, SteamyTea said:

Low energy housing only becomes an issue when energy prices rise dramatically.

 

If I had said in 1974 "I have seen the future of motoring, it weighs over 2 ton and does twelve to the gallon" everyone would have laughed.

There are about 400,000 RangeRovers on the UK roads.

Good point … oil is running out, we must cut motoring costs …. Sell bigger cars! 🤔.

I wonder how many 4x4’s every go off tarmac or tow heavy trailers?.

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Mobile phones got smaller and smaller until someone realised they could watch porn on them …. 

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8 minutes ago, markc said:

wonder how many 4x4’s every go off tarmac or tow heavy trailers?.

They often haul a big dick around.

8 minutes ago, markc said:

Mobile phones got smaller and smaller until someone realised they could watch porn on them …. 

Mine is 9 inches now.

  • Haha 1

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Looking at the electrical cars on offer at the moment, they seem to be making the cars even bigger, saw an Audi the other day, electric, but as big or bigger than my van.

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2 hours ago, markc said:

 

I wonder how many 4x4’s every go off tarmac or tow heavy trailers?.

 

They're great for driving on footpaths.

  • Haha 1

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4 hours ago, SteamyTea said:

Low energy housing only becomes an issue when energy prices rise dramatically.

I think energy prices were already high enough for a lot of people last year, when we put our house on the market. There were other factors affecting the market such as the Stamp Duty holiday though. People seem to think they are spending too much of their income on keeping warm when it could be spent on booze and fags. I prefer keeping warm.

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