dangti6

20mm scalping instead of Type 1

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Merchant currently has no bulk bags of 40mm Type 1 MOT available for delivery, but does have 20mm scalpings.

 

Intended use - sub base for a pedestrian path which will be laid to slabs.

 

Be 'reet won't it?¬†ūü§†

 

 

 

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Scalpings so as in tarmac scalpings ? If so when your whacking it down spray it with a generous dose of diesel to help soften it up…… 

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Best check what they mean by scalpings.

 

To me there are MOT I, MOT II, Road planings, Road planings Type I and Type II.

and scalpings. 

 

As I understood it scalpings were slightly inferior, quite good for under a road, but not to MOT grades.

I think basically the nearest the quarry could get to Type II with their own materials.

 

From a quick google I see a lot of the above being interchanged,.

 

Ask.

 

But for a pedestrian path, any should be fine.

 

The bitumen content of road planings is surprisingly little, (5% or less, and coating the stone) and imo it will stick back together without dissolving.

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They said the scalpings are a poorer grade containing clay depending where it comes from. Did say that some do cheekily class 40mm scalpings as type 1 when it's not strictly the case, having to meet a certain standard etc. In the end they managed to get me some 'type 1' for tomorrow and there was only about a quid between the two types.

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if by scalping's you mean road planning's, then they are very very good. Just watch out for occasional lumps of manhole or kerb mixed in.

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When you say merchant do you means builders merchant? Best going direct here to whomever drives the bulkers

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On 26/07/2021 at 17:04, dangti6 said:

Merchant currently has no bulk bags of 40mm Type 1 MOT available for delivery, but does have 20mm scalpings.

 

Intended use - sub base for a pedestrian path which will be laid to slabs.

 

Be 'reet won't it?¬†ūü§†

 

 

 

If it's a public pedestrian path be careful as the Highway Dept may not accept as scalpings often don't comply with the plasticity requirements.

 

On 26/07/2021 at 17:24, Cpd said:

Scalpings so as in tarmac scalpings ? If so when your whacking it down spray it with a generous dose of diesel to help soften it up…… 

Happy days when you could get road planings to do your drive to your new house or fill in a hole. Was great stuff.

 

Times have changed. Think twice before you take up an an offer from a "road squad" who are doing a job "round the corner" and are offering a few loads of road planings for a few quid.

 

It's not so much the bitumen content but the other contaminants that go with it! Do you really want this material on your property and the potential liability that comes with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Gus Potter said:

not so much the bitumen content but the other contaminants that go with it

Do you mean that a shifty supplier might have mixed nasty stuff in?

Otherwise, in what way have times changed?

 I like road planings as it is about 95% (? have to check) well graded stone stuck together with bitumen.

Have even used it under floor slabs, with BCO approval.

Only from a merchant though, as the other is encouraging dodgy cash deals.

 

What I don't like is footpath material as it is very loose and weak.

 

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17 minutes ago, saveasteading said:

I like road planings as it is about 95% (? have to check) well graded stone stuck together with bitumen.

 Yes this was my understanding…. The council use it to repair our roads which are no more than dirt tracks and when I can get a load I always fill in various holes on my own dirt track, nothing else works as well and I have 870m of private dirt track that I need to maintain at my own cost so a free load of planings  every now and then seems like a good option to me. 

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The first time I used it as sub-base   in a big building, the building inspector said it couldn't be used as it is organic. I suppose technically he is right but the reg's mean plant material , not oil-based product.. fortunately it came with a Type 1 certificate and he went away happy. It is great in a building because it goes flat and stays put.

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1 hour ago, saveasteading said:

The first time I used it as sub-base   in a big building, the building inspector said it couldn't be used as it is organic. I suppose technically he is right but the reg's mean plant material , not oil-based product.. fortunately it came with a Type 1 certificate and he went away happy. It is great in a building because it goes flat and stays put.

 

your right, technically to the letter of the law planeings are not allowed. But in the real world its a good use to recycle and lower the carbon footprint. They also stop the weeds which is an added bonus.

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On 19/09/2021 at 11:52, saveasteading said:

Do you mean that a shifty supplier might have mixed nasty stuff in?

Otherwise, in what way have times changed?

 I like road planings as it is about 95% (? have to check) well graded stone stuck together with bitumen.

Have even used it under floor slabs, with BCO approval.

Only from a merchant though, as the other is encouraging dodgy cash deals.

 

What I don't like is footpath material as it is very loose and weak.

 

"Do you mean that a shifty supplier might have mixed nasty stuff in?"

 

I do.

 

"Otherwise, in what way have times changed?"

 

Well I mentioned "happy days" Back then folk were not that daft, as are folk here are not too. In the happy days if someone had mixed broken asbestos sheets, fag packets,  big lumps of bitumen, dead fish into the road planings, you will, even as a lay person be able to see it and say "hang on". But one thing that can be hidden is this.

 

Generally modern bitumen planings are fairly benign. But up until the mid 1980's coal tar was used in roads and that contains a potential nasty mix of carcinogens that are more mobile. In other words they can leach more easily into your plot and start to contaminate your land. Now, when they are planing an old road they may take off the modern top layer (bitumen based), and a bit more.. the bit with the coal tar. So the top planings go to recycling, the last load (with the coal tar content) goes to you cheep.

 

Back in the "happy days" we had little idea or knowledge about hydrocarbon pollution.

 

"Have even used it under floor slabs, with BCO approval."

 

Yes we did!

 

For me if you have bought a plot or doing up you house why risk introducing an additional pollutant?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I could do with a couple of jumbo bags of "genuine", black tar scalpings or whatever they're called. When I dug out for my gate power supply I had to break through a layer of it on what is ostensibly an unmade drive. At one time it clearly had a layer of this stuff down. The previous owner "topped it up" with fire ash. Given the number of rusty, burnt angular ring nails that come to the surface periodically (and lodge in our tyres ūüė§) burning pallets was a thing. I've been left with a nom 300mm wide, 13m long depression in the drive that needs filling. Come winter it'll just be mud!

 

Found some seemingly legit road planing places in the Tunbridge area that might sell me a couple of bags if I transport. 

Edited by Onoff

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