Mr Punter

Plywood v chipboard for upper floors

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The engineer has specified 18mm ply for upper floors for this brick / block building.  I asked to change for 22mm Egger Protect chipboard.  They came back saying ply was needed for the overall stability strategy.

 

I like the Egger stuff because it stays in decent shape after exposure to the elements and it is a fair bit cheaper.

 

Are they correct or should I go back to them again?

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Ply exposed to the elements wouldn’t last long 18 mil would require 400 centres 22 cabba or similar is the flooring of choice on most I boarded ours then sheeted it with plastic It was left exposed for six weeks without any adverse effect 

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Im assuming the ply is specified for bracing. Ply is good in tension and compression, chipboard is only good in compression

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10 minutes ago, nod said:

18 mil would require 400 centres

 

Yes I did not even think of that.  So more joists and more material costs.  Or thicker ply?

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9 minutes ago, markc said:

Im assuming the ply is specified for bracing. Ply is good in tension and compression, chipboard is only good in compression

 

OK I suppose they may need the tension property.  I am not sure why though.  We always have chipboard in timber frame stuff.  Does brick and block need something more special?

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, Mr Punter said:

 

OK I suppose they may need the tension property.  I am not sure why though.  We always have chipboard in timber frame stuff.  Does brick and block need something more special?

Generally no, brick and block is usually pretty stable. Maybe the overall design or lack on internal walls etc. making the Arch or Eng err on the safe sade

Edited by markc
side

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23 minutes ago, Mr Punter said:

 

OK I suppose they may need the tension property.  I am not sure why though.  We always have chipboard in timber frame stuff.  Does brick and block need something more special?

It’s probably worth  counter battening the underside for plaster boarding This will also stop any twisting and will help stop floorboard creek later 

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25 minutes ago, nod said:

It’s probably worth  counter battening the underside for plaster boarding This will also stop any twisting and will help stop floorboard creek later 

 

No enough space.  They are nogged and will have resilient bar under.

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Res bar will do 

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