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Hello,

I have a detached garage which is around 30cm from the neigbour's garage and am looking at demolishing this and rebuilding it to use as an office. I am considering getting a SIP kit from Sips Eco Panels in order to minimise the wall thickness (compared to the typical block-cavity-block structure) as I am limited by the width of the garage.

 

As I will be building less than 1M from the boundary, to meet building reqs, I will have to clad it in fibre cement board ( Euroclass A0-d0, s2 rating) but do not have the space to work on the side of the neigbour's garage so was thinking about the possibility of assembling 5 x 1.2m panels on the ground, attaching a breathable membrane, battens and cement board and then lifting into place on the sole plate? Would this approach work and if so, what would be the options for lifting it? Would aligning the base next to the sole plate and having 5-6 people lift from the other side until the bottom of the panel wall sits on the plate or am I talking nonsense and will end up damaging the bottom of the OSB board?

 

Also, would building the back wall with block and then using SIP's for the other 3 walls and roof be a viable solution

 

Am a novice so any advice would be greatly appreciated

 

Thanks

Nasim

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That’s how I would do it, glue them all together while on the flat, batten and clad then get 3 mates around and stand it up. 

Have props ready. And nails and a hammer. 

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That's the traditional way of building a timber frame wall (although it's usually not with the cladding in place due to weight), so you're spot on. I little tip to make things easier when lifting is to put some 4 inch nails diagonally through the sole plate into the floor before you lift the wall. This will stop the wall from sliding off the side of your floor when you're part way through the lift.

 

Have fun!

Edited by SimonD

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18 hours ago, Russell griffiths said:

That’s how I would do it, glue them all together while on the flat, batten and clad then get 3 mates around and stand it up. 

Have props ready. And nails and a hammer. 

 

Thank you Russell. The weight of the 5 panels and cement boards comes to around 285KG. Just concerned that when standing it up, at some point, most of the weight will be on the one edge of the OSB (before it sits vertically on the sole plate) - Will the 11mm OSB boards be strong enough to withstand that?

 

 

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13 hours ago, SimonD said:

That's the traditional way of building a timber frame wall (although it's usually not with the cladding in place due to weight), so you're spot on. I little tip to make things easier when lifting is to put some 4 inch nails diagonally through the sole plate into the floor before you lift the wall. This will stop the wall from sliding off the side of your floor when you're part way through the lift.

 

Have fun!

Thanks for the tip

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52 minutes ago, nh26302 said:

 

Thank you Russell. The weight of the 5 panels and cement boards comes to around 285KG. Just concerned that when standing it up, at some point, most of the weight will be on the one edge of the OSB (before it sits vertically on the sole plate) - Will the 11mm OSB boards be strong enough to withstand that?

 

 

Why not screw another bit of timber along the edge, bit of 2x2 screwed on to protect edge as you lift. 

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Hi.

How did you get on with this?

 

This is exactly what I am proposing to do, I am building an extension with a timber frame and one of the walls will be within 300mm of the neighbours wall.

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