Tomfromsurrey

Dry Hip and Dry Ridge problem on new build

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I wonder what happens when it rains and water comes down that downpipe on the porch.  Presumably it spreads to the left and under those strange looking tiles between the garage and the porch. 

 

I suspect that the ridge tiles will all lift and rattle in a strong window as the top clip looks like it hasn't been pushed down before the screw was put it.  Usually the top clip has a teeth on it that hook into the dry ridge union and it can be set at different heights to handle different thicknesses of tiles. 

Edited by BobAJob

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Thanks guys. Looks like we have to think about walking. I doubt we will find another new place on a small development in a good location  and still get the stamp duty reduction. Time to discuss with the wife.

 

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It's your money at the end of the day so it's your risk. Just by looking at the pics you have posted it doesn't paint a very good picture of the quality of the work that has been done already so could well be a very good indicator of what you will find inside. So it all boils down to how much you and your family really want to live in this house in this location and how quick the builder will be to remedy any faults that arise in the coming months. 

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At the risk of being strung up... are we being overly critical here... is everyone looking at this from the perspective of the self-builder (who is always aiming for perfection) rather than comparing this with other development type build standards? 
 

Is this any worse that the usual corner cutting you would see or expect on a new development? 
 

There are probably millions of new builds out there with significant amounts of poor workmanship, but most home owners would never notice or care. 

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5 hours ago, Oz07 said:

Mr punter c'mon wouldn't you ever try to sell a house with that porch to garage roof transition? Screams amateur builder to me. 

 

No, like I say, strip off the porch and re-roof, tidy the gutter and fix the dry ridge.  I suspect that @Oz07 is right there is a window above the porch so the lead is too low.  The window the other side has a soldier course under and that corresponds to the location of the lead here and the ensuing mess.

 

Maybe architect drawings were poor or different size windows selected.  Brickie just wants to finish and get paid.  It all gets left to the roofer / leadworker, neither of whom are at the top of their game.

 

With the walls either side of the garage door, again it looks like this has not been set out to brick dimensions and having got there the bricklayer did not know how or could not be bothered to make the broken bond look acceptable.

 

It is not the best but not unusual either.

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9 minutes ago, Gav_P said:

At the risk of being strung up... are we being overly critical here... is everyone looking at this from the perspective of the self-builder (who is always aiming for perfection) rather than comparing this with other development type build standards? 
 

Is this any worse that the usual corner cutting you would see or expect on a new development? 
 

There are probably millions of new builds out there with significant amounts of poor workmanship, but most home owners would never notice or care. 

Nope, a house is the biggest investment you will make in your life ( probably) 

most people spend more time looking at a new car than they do a new house. 

If you compared that house to a car you would be walking around it seeing that the door doesn’t shut properly, the sunroof leaks. 

Why would you put up with glaringly obvious faults.  

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To put in perspective I have seem some absolute garbage on the site I'm on atm. I don't think you'd see that roof detail there because they're drawn out pretty well being a volume builder, however the workmanship is dog poo. Perhaps the only reason I get a start there!

 

Had to go in an occupied house last week, get in loft cut through fixings top of stud wall, cut out plasterboard below and plumb up the wall. Was an inch out of plumb!

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2 minutes ago, Russell griffiths said:

Nope, a house is the biggest investment you will make in your life ( probably) 

most people spend more time looking at a new car than they do a new house. 

If you compared that house to a car you would be walking around it seeing that the door doesn’t shut properly, the sunroof leaks. 

Why would you put up with glaringly obvious faults.  

Using the car analogy, are you not comparing Rolls-Royce build quality to Chevrolet? They will have been thrown together with less care, and will more likely need some rectification. 
 

My point is, most people won’t see the same faults as the self build community and therefore aren’t bothered by them. 
 

And to be fair, the OP could have bought his house, lived very comfortably in it for a few years with everything working and then sell it before most of us get halfway through out projects. Where as half us are in caravans, or half finished houses for years. 😂... why would you put up with this glaringly obvious fault? 

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3 minutes ago, Gav_P said:

Using the car analogy, are you not comparing Rolls-Royce build quality to Chevrolet? They will have been thrown together with less care, and will more likely need some rectification. 
 

My point is, most people won’t see the same faults as the self build community and therefore aren’t bothered by them. 
 

And to be fair, the OP could have bought his house, lived very comfortably in it for a few years with everything working and then sell it before most of us get halfway through out projects. Where as half us are in caravans, or half finished houses for years. 😂... why would you put up with this glaringly obvious fault? 

Nope, not comparing rolls Royce to Chevrolet 

comparing a new car with a new car, not a second hand one

if You paid £10,000 for a car or £50,000 you would expect it to come without faults, the engine might not be as smooth as the £50,000 one but you would expect the doors to fit and the boot to shut properly. 

 

The original poster must have noticed the faults as he posted  the pictures up 🤦🏻‍♂️

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20 minutes ago, Russell griffiths said:

Nope, a house is the biggest investment you will make in your life ( probably) 

most people spend more time looking at a new car than they do a new house. 

If you compared that house to a car you would be walking around it seeing that the door doesn’t shut properly, the sunroof leaks. 

Why would you put up with glaringly obvious faults.  

Back in the late 1980s my parents bought a new build.  They lived in it for 5 years and then one day the Study ceiling fell through. It turned out that whoever installed it had cut the pipe from the bath to the drain slightly too short and for 5 years trickles of water had been running down onto the ceiling below. 

 

However, new builds these days seem to be worse than they were 20 years ago.  I've heard stories like the following:

 

1. 2 neighbours on a new build estate living in the same style of house asking each other about a light switch by the door to the cupboard under the stairs.  One had a switch that did nothing and one had a switch that turned on a light in the cupboard.  It turned out that the builder had forgotten to install the light in one house.

 

2. Concrete floors in kitchens that were uneven and had to be ground level while people were living in the house. 

 

3. People moving into new build and discovering "Fix this" and an arrow pointing to a defect in the way the kitchen was fitted and the defect hadn't been fixed. 

 

4. Overflow pipes from toilet cisterns being totally missing

 

5. People having from seal around bath not being done properly and ending up having to have the ceiling below replaced. 

 

6. Extractor fans from bathrooms that aren't connected to the hoses that run to the outside of the house, so fan is putting a load of moist air into the loft

 

7. Cracks opening in brick walls when front doors opened and closed. 

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Regarding no.4 how long has it been since you've fitted a toilet. While I agree with the sentiment of the post I may have a revelation for you...

  • Haha 3

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1 hour ago, Oz07 said:

Regarding no.4 how long has it been since you've fitted a toilet. While I agree with the sentiment of the post I may have a revelation for you...

That was a toilet back in 1970s.  Another new build my parents bought.  No overflows fitted to any of the toilets. The water ruined all the new carpets downstairs.  I know that new ones don't need overflows. 

 

They had a neighbour who never decorated his house in 40 years because the plaster on his walls all came off.  He ended up suing the builder and eventually won after 15 years. 

 

I also know someone who moved into a house with a swimming pool and one day they put their foot down in the middle of the pool and one of the tiles came off. On closer inspection they found that a number of the tiles were coming off and one of the walls was bulging.  A surveyor later discovered that the builder hadn't used waterproof grout and the whole thing had to be redone.  Another court case against the surveyor which was eventually won.  Total cost £10,000s of repairs and one marriage. 

Edited by BobAJob

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In answer to the question about the window over the porch, yes there is one. I can see the lead is under the soldier course under the window.9A2B7248-E607-4078-AD3C-C95562FCE705.thumb.jpeg.d8995c1ea03421d5c0e1bfc576468ae0.jpeg

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On 22/11/2020 at 11:48, Oz07 said:

To be fair there could be a window cill at that porch lead flashing level. It's a poxy 3" upstand and could be the only reason someone would leave that transition looking like that...and there are still better ways of dealing with it. 

OP do I win? Is there a window to the right of that picture above the porch?


If they cannot raise the porch roof to match the garage roof to give a better transition, how could it be constructed to make the join look better?

Should the lead work where the garage roof joins the wall be over the tiles or under the tiles? At the ridge the final ridge tile is up at an angle and only fitted at one end because it is sitting on the lead. What should have been done at that point?

Photos are in earlier replies.

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May be good to strip the tiles and replace with lead, done by a proper leadworker.

 

image.png.c389476de0d1b2e2de678ce26c9ed5bf.png

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my god I could have forgiven it if the cill was tight to the flashing but why not just grind through the soldiers 3" up to give it a proper upstand?!

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