Thedreamer

Fire alarms Scotland

Recommended Posts

My colleague mentioned to me that all homes in Scotland have to install mains connected smoke alarms by February 21?

 

Perhaps this will be pushed back because of COVID, but if not and you didn't would your insurance be invalid?

 

£200/£300 is a bit of money for an installation around Christmas time when people are hard up.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes we had a leaflet through the door a few days ago regarding this, smoke alarms, heat and co2 alarms, luckily we have them all but I did wonder if the local authorities would be able to spend all that cash doing all their rental properties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't thought about the insurance aspect. I had assumed that it might not be an issue in practise until the time came to sell or rent out a property.

For how long has it been mandatory on new builds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I did not see this one coming, don't recall it even being talked about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Thedreamer said:

My colleague mentioned to me that all homes in Scotland have to install mains connected smoke alarms by February 21?

 

I think they have to be interlinked but do not have to be mains powered?

 

Quote

Alarms that meet the new standard, both tamper proof long-life lithium battery alarms and mains-wired alarms, are widely available in general hardware outlets and online.

 

https://www.gov.scot/publications/fire-and-smoke-alarms-in-scottish-homes/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really looked into it because we have just finished our self build. 

 

Whether they are mains or interlinked, it's still going to be a job that the average person is going to get a sparky to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Thedreamer said:

Whether they are mains or interlinked, it's still going to be a job that the average person is going to get a sparky to do.

insurance would require it to be done by a sparky I would think

 and along with a record of test and when they are done 

Edited by scottishjohn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good posts.

 

Don't skimp on the smoke alarms.

 

You'll often see folk complaining (maybe not so much on build hub) about say activity spaces in kitchens, bathooms and smoke alarms.

 

The building regulations are, in part are designed to keep you safe.

 

For me, the fire regulations need to be improved and made more robust. Overall, it's a small extra amount. If you have ever been in a fire it is no fun, you want to make sure you can get out first, then be glad that you did it the right way and that the insurance will pay to clean up what is left.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Thedreamer said:

As expected this has now been delayed.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-54621068

 

What a waste of paper, time and costs for the leaflets issued.

 

I suppose at least now people know about the change.

just another comment on SNP ability to run  a government I feel 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn’t know either until recently but there has been a bit of chat about it on a local forum. Apparently you can have wireless ones that interlink if they have a tamper proof battery. Other then that an electrician would need to install a mains one. People are apparently being quoted £600 to supply and fit the mains ones. 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whenever this is actually implemented, I expect the majority will ignore it, a bit like all septic tanks discharging to a watercourse must be updated to a treatment plant by January 2020.

 

I would think by now all rental properties will have them, that's been law for a while. 

 

As to price.  It all depends on how much work is needed.  It can be very disruptive getting new cables pulled around a house, which is where the wireless ones are your friend.

 

Needless to say, nobody has asked me to quote yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my thoughts are 

new build --mains 

retro fit --wirless battery 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, ProDave said:

Whenever this is actually implemented, I expect the majority will ignore it, a bit like all septic tanks discharging to a watercourse must be updated to a treatment plant by January 2020.

 

I would think by now all rental properties will have them, that's been law for a while. 

 

As to price.  It all depends on how much work is needed.  It can be very disruptive getting new cables pulled around a house, which is where the wireless ones are your friend.

 

Needless to say, nobody has asked me to quote yet.

 

The risk of insurance being invalid, to me would be main reason most will install. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Presumably these can be powered from a lighting circuit? Seems like the easiest way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Crofter said:

Presumably these can be powered from a lighting circuit? Seems like the easiest way.

If you have "loop at light" it's easy to pick up a permanent feed and use a wireless alarm.  But not if you have "loop at switch"

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder whether premiums will reduce for houses fitted with these systems.   
 

I do fear for the elderly and vulnerable getting ripped off by dodgy firms pushing systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will there be anything to stop a homeowner doing this themselves, or will it fall within the existing 'competent person' rule?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Crofter said:

Will there be anything to stop a homeowner doing this themselves

 

The link I gave before:- https://www.gov.scot/publications/fire-and-smoke-alarms-in-scottish-homes/

 

Quote

This is based on using the type of alarms that you can install by yourself without the need for an electrician for installing a hard-wired alarm.

 

Possibly the insurance companies may object.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess I'll be replacing two existing mains powered hall smoke alarms (with battery backup, but probably without an existing interlink) with new ones - plus the additional sensors now mandatory in the kitchen and lounge.

 

Any product recommendations if forced to go down the RF route? Looks like the Aico range would require buying multiple RF modules which would get pricy...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely Aico all the time for me.  Shop around and you can get them a bit cheaper.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now