Geordie1982

How to stop damp

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Well the Shed is going to be here in less than a month it’s 10ft x 10ft it is going on a patio but the company is putting it on “wooden bearers” to let air flow under shed. 
I presume there will be several 10ft bearers running from front to back. 
Is there anything I can put on top of the bearers to stop damp coming through bearers and getting on to shed floor ie strips of plastic sheeting length and width of each bit of wooden bearer. 
The shed is probably pre made in a shop and then nailed together in the garden so anything I need I will have to get before hand and try and install while they do the shed. 

Also the shed will be tanalised wood so kind of a greeny colour. 
what can we do to help prolong the life of it as in painting it do we need a certain kind as she would like it a grey colour for the shed 😂😂😂

 

many Thanks

Edited by Geordie1982

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9 hours ago, Geordie1982 said:

what can we do to help prolong the life of it as in painting it do we need a certain kind as she would like it a grey colour for the shed

We have used Cuprinol Garden Shades to paint various woodwork in the garden. It goes on really smoothly and easily and seems to last well. Lots of colours to choose from.

 

https://www.cuprinol.co.uk/products/garden_shades.jsp

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Buy a roll of damp proof course from toolstation screwfix, couple of staples into top of bearers before they put the floor down. 

 

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I would put the DPC under the bearers as well.

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You ideally want to keep any wood of the shed 6" above the surrounding ground. Treat the Hell out of the bearers. 

 

The age old and tbh accepted premise is that a raindrop bounces 6" up in the air. 

 

You can mitigate the lack of 6" to some extent by painting the bottom timbers of the shed with a black bitumen paint. Can look quite good tbh.

 

Deffo dpc strips above and below the bearers.

 

 

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Thanks for the replies everyone will put some damp proof membrane under and on top of bearers. 
Wish I did have time to paint the bearers and under the shed floor but don’t think the people putting the shed up would like it if they have to stand about while I paint underneath it would probably get charged double😂😂
 

Anyone had any experience with Cuprinol Ducks back shed paint it seems to get good reviews but can never trust them 

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3 minutes ago, Geordie1982 said:

Thanks for the replies everyone will put some damp proof membrane under and on top of bearers. 
Wish I did have time to paint the bearers and under the shed floor but don’t think the people putting the shed up would like it if they have to stand about while I paint underneath it would probably get charged double😂😂
 

Anyone had any experience with Cuprinol Ducks back shed paint it seems to get good reviews but can never trust them 

 

You've a vote for the Cuprinol Garden Shades above. I've then used Cuprinol non slip deck stain and it really does what it says on the tin. Reckon you'd be safe with the Ducks Back.

 

 

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Some "old school stuff" on timber rot / infestation (woodworm etc) theory.

 

It does not thrive in; dark, cold, dry and draughty places. So when designing aim for that, then you can add to it modern theory and treatments. Bear these fundamental principles in mind and you are off to a good start. Design well and you may not need a lot, if any added chemicals... and save money to boot!

 

Ask this.. how did they manage to do it in the past before we had all these added treatments and formulae paints etc? There are timber framed buildings that have stood for hundred's of years!

 

Keep it out the rain splash zone that Onoff mentions and so on.

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8 hours ago, Gus Potter said:

There are timber framed buildings that have stood for hundred's of years!

they used REAL wood  and did not sit it on the ground 

probably large lumps of stone where the structure would hit ground  with lots of draft space under it

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Good old fashioned railway sleepers make a good shed greenhouse base. I believe they were steeped in vats of proper creosote. 

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1 hour ago, Onoff said:

Good old fashioned railway sleepers make a good shed greenhouse base. I believe they were steeped in vats of proper creosote. 

And you are not allowed to reuse them as far as I know.

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24 minutes ago, SteamyTea said:

And you are not allowed to reuse them as far as I know.

 

I'd best dismantle the kids sandpit then!

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Slate packers under wood bearers at 600c/c ventilation will do the rest 

Edited by tonyshouse
Added bit

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Scottish John is bang on. They did use large lumps of stone, smaller ones on top and a bit of compacted clay / straw say on top of that.

 

You can use the same engineering principles when looking at foundation depth in terms of frost cover to your founds and so on in today's day and age. For example if you have site that is founded on rock (or soft fractured / partly weathered rock) it can often be hard to explain to the less familiar why you are not following the warranty provider's guidance on mimimum depths to the underside of the found.

 

 

 

 

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