Cresswelle

Hip to gable loft conversion on a corner plot

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Hi all. Just after some advice pls and opinions.

 

We are in the process of planning a hip to gable loft extension with dormer and am getting conflicting advice if planning permission is needed. 
 

We live on a corner plot and the architect we have gone with advised that we don’t need planning but has advised to get a certificate of lawful development anyway. His initial advice was that planning was needed but when checking the guidance changed his mind. 

 

“As per my voicemail this morning, I mis-advised you yesterday; having checked the technical guidance of the permitted development rules, the side dormer or hip to gable conversion does not need planning permission - only extensions beyond the plane of a roof on the principal elevation require planning. That's different for ground/first floor extensions however, hence my initial advice.
I always encourage my clients to obtain a 'Certificate of Lawful Development' even where planning is not required as that gives you proof in future that the works were carried out lawfully”
 
We had a different architect do drawings for our extension and had him also quote for the loft but he was very expensive so didn’t go with him for the loft. He’s doing some amendments to our current side extension but has just said that we need planning permission if we go ahead with the loft and sent me this.
 
We’ve literally just submitted the app for the certificate and tbh I’ll be pretty fed up if we need planning but who is right? 
 
I don’t fancy getting 6 weeks down the line to be told we need planning after all. 
 
thanks 
 
 

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You can pay for pre application meetings at most councils which should be reliable, but is also slow, and my local council are making them very low priority.. .

 

Mine did free morning consultations with the duty officer (pre Covid) and you get their opinion, but beware, I got completely rubbish advice and wasted weeks with no recourse (I wanted to stay on friendly terms!). 

 

 

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Thanks. It’s more frustration that neither architect can give me a definite answer and it’s likely to end up costing me

money. 
 

 

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I think it is PD but worth getting the LDC just in case.  Someone I know got a LDC for a load of dormers to some houses.  He did not realise that PD rights had been removed when the houses were first built but the LDC meant that the council could do nothing about it.

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Thanks I’m hopeful it is. Suppose now it’s been submitted we’ll find out one way or another. 
 

We’ve been looking at lots of options to extend the living space and this is the best option due to planning not liking the idea of a double storey extension to the side. Hopefully we’ll get the LDC through ok. 

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Even though it is a corner plot in which two elevations front a highway, the main/principal elevation would be that to the front as per...

 

“in most cases the principal elevation will be that part of the house which fronts (directly or at an angle) the main highway serving the house (the main highway will be the one that sets the postcode for the house concerned). It will usually contain the main architectural features such as main bay windows or a porch serving the main entrance to the house. Usually, but not exclusively, the principal elevation will be what is understood to be the front of the house.
There will only be one principal elevation on a house. Where there are two elevations which may have the character of a principal elevation, for example on a corner plot, a view will need to be taken as to which of these forms the principal elevation.”

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1 hour ago, DevilDamo said:

Even though it is a corner plot in which two elevations front a highway, the main/principal elevation would be that to the front as per...

 

“in most cases the principal elevation will be that part of the house which fronts (directly or at an angle) the main highway serving the house (the main highway will be the one that sets the postcode for the house concerned). It will usually contain the main architectural features such as main bay windows or a porch serving the main entrance to the house. Usually, but not exclusively, the principal elevation will be what is understood to be the front of the house.
There will only be one principal elevation on a house. Where there are two elevations which may have the character of a principal elevation, for example on a corner plot, a view will need to be taken as to which of these forms the principal elevation.”

 Thanks. That’s how I interpret the rules. I’m keeping everything crossed 

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14 hours ago, DevilDamo said:

Even though it is a corner plot in which two elevations front a highway, the main/principal elevation would be that to the front as per...

 

“in most cases the principal elevation will be that part of the house which fronts (directly or at an angle) the main highway serving the house (the main highway will be the one that sets the postcode for the house concerned). It will usually contain the main architectural features such as main bay windows or a porch serving the main entrance to the house. Usually, but not exclusively, the principal elevation will be what is understood to be the front of the house.
There will only be one principal elevation on a house. Where there are two elevations which may have the character of a principal elevation, for example on a corner plot, a view will need to be taken as to which of these forms the principal elevation.”

 

Can I have a reference for that .. I thought it was different to that and it is good to hear.

 

F

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