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Regulations - decking on a slope

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The rear of my property drops by 1m across the width of the rear of my property. I would like to build a deck across the back of the property with probably one step down across its length. The PD and government advice is you need decking to be 30cm above ground level. Which as you can imagine could be at many points. Does anyone have any experience of dealing with this issue? The challenge is that at one end, its is 90cm above ground level and if you were to stand on it, you would be overlooking significantly next door. Thoughts on best approach appreciated. 

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You could have the decking stepped so none is more than 300mm above tge existing soil level, or dig down on on side, by say 700mm and then have a level decking all the way across

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If you dont’t have anything In it to antagonise neighbours eg overlooking you may well get away with it.

 

They do not want you suddenly being able to stand on your decking and looking into their garden casually.

 

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I think you are ok because of the way "height" is defined on sloping ground. This will be familiar to people building extensions or outbuildings on sloping ground as it also applies to the way the eaves and ridge height are defined..

 

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/596/pdfs/uksi_20150596_en.pdf

 



(2) Unless the context otherwise requires, any reference in this Order to the height of a building 
or of plant or machinery is to be construed as a reference to its height when measured from ground level; and for the purposes of this paragraph “ground level” means the level of the surface of the 
ground immediately adjacent to the building or plant or machinery in question or, where the level 
of the surface of the ground on which it is situated or is to be situated is not uniform, the level of
the highest part of the surface of the ground adjacent to it.


 

See also..

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/permitted-development-rights-for-householders-technical-guidance

 

Page 6



Where ground level is not uniform (for example if the ground is sloping), then the ground level is the highest part of the surface of the ground next to the building.)

 

See also someone complaining about similar decking on sloping ground..

 

https://www.gardenlaw.co.uk/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=20009#p188412

 

the planning officer responds saying as part of the platform touches the original ground level it is within permitted development and there is nothing the council can do.

 

You should probably check with the planners just in case I'm looking at out of date regs but I reckon its fine at least as far as planning regs go. Neighbourly relations are another matter.

 

There is one important point. If you were to build the deck and then later extend it, the new part would be treated as a separate development. It's height would be measured from the highest ground adjacent to it, not the highest point adjacent to the original deck. So build it all in one go.

 

 

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