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Ferdinand

Little Brown Bungalow

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So. One week later and the LBB is now completely stripped :-),

 

 Photos later.

 

Ferdinand

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Here we go. Post-strip out photos.

 

5906e7c1ae3c7_20170428_132648-small-Copy.thumb.jpg.80119eb1af0b1780733062dd987c7cd9.jpg5906e7c2e932b_20170428_132513-small-Copy.thumb.jpg.7730a37b35e01febae3bf90e105366e9.jpg5906e7c39d07b_20170428_132630-small-Copy.thumb.jpg.adf62a207503ab7f8a6768e013df6983.jpg5906e7c427ff0_20170428_132645-small-Copy.thumb.jpg.d9086bcc2ab5d8e30832cd9e876246d8.jpg5906e83ac4689_img_0016_small-Copy.thumb.jpg.e0304cdec59d612f840ee5961dcdf807.jpg5906e8e4a2f23_20170428_132615-small-Copy(2).thumb.jpg.e6e36f46d4fe788d91d08e146fcb88f1.jpg5906e8f57f673_20170428_132754-small-Copy.thumb.jpg.85bd835605688c24770347e99fff4ce2.jpg

 

Edited by Ferdinand

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An interesting point has been dampness.

 

We have:

 

1 - A slab in the carport has been done up to airbrick level post-build in our case, so when the car port roof / main roof junction leaks and drips under the car port (ie still outside) that puddle seeps through the airbrick. I am told that all of them have the carport leak problem but many people have inserted conservatories or extensions.

 

2 - A slow trickle leak from back boiler pipework for heaven knows how long - months or years - into the void. Fortunately it is well ventilated and there is little damaged wood. Needs a careful inspection and perhaps some of the most 'orrible preservative from Wickes may be indicated.

 

3 - Water tracking up the ultra-shallow polycarb carport roof and causing the same problem as one. The area is elevated and on occasion windy. That gives me a slight cause for concern re: potentially wet cavity wall insulation which will need a check.

 

Ferdinand

 

Edited by Ferdinand

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A fix (if it would look OK) might be to run a diamond saw along and cut away a thin section of the car port slab, 100mm or so would do, and add a slender French drain between the house wall and the car port slab.  I did the same (but cheated) when we had exactly this problem with water blowing in under the car port of our old house and causing damp in the garage to which it's attached.  In my case, whoever laid the car port slab used 6 x 2s all around the edge for the levels, and with a bit of effort I was able to just remove the 6 x 2 alongside the garage and fill the gap with pea shingle.  That's worked a treat, and completely fixed the problem.

Edited by JSHarris

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1 hour ago, JSHarris said:

A fix (if it would look OK) might be to run a diamond saw along and cut away a thin section of the car port slab, 100mm or so would do, and add a slender French drain between the house wall and the car port slab.  I did the same (but cheated) when we had exactly this problem with water blowing in under the car port of our old house and causing damp in the garage to which it's attached.  In my case, whoever laid the car port slab used 6 x 2s all around the edge for the levels, and with a bit of effort I was able to just remove the 6 x 2 alongside the garage and fill the gap with pea shingle.  That's worked a treat, and completely fixed the problem.

 

Good thought. I had been reflecting on switching the airbrick up a level and using an offset sleeve vent, but I do not know of those for 50mm cavities (bet they exist, mind).

 

The only thing I need to check is that there is a potential outlet to cut to nearby so it is not just a long thin pond.

 

It is tempting to do both.

 

(Added: Reflecting, the car pot has 3 walls and a roof, and this is in the middle at the back so it will need 5-7m of carve out. So the periscope void vent is easier - which I just found for £6 delivered including a brown air brick via Amazon. So it will need a proper seal on the carport roof, as there is minimal forward slope on the slab).

Edited by Ferdinand
PS Added

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I think it's always better to try and stop damp getting at the outside of a wall than to try and resolve the problem after it's there, although often this isn't practical. 

 

The worst example of blocking under floor vents I've seen was an old chapel that we once looked at, and wanted to buy.  We didn't because the structural survey showed up a long list of major problems, one of which was that the owners had shipped in many tonnes of soil to make a raised garden along one side of the chapel, where there had been a sunken path leading to the rear entrance.  The ground level was around 3ft higher than it had been, and the surveyor spotted this and was able to get a look under a floor board.  This revealed a mass of white threads of rot - the whole floor was in danger of collapse in his view and needed to be removed as soon as possible and replace, with proper ventilation restored.  That, together with the fact that the ties holding the side walls together at roof level had been removed to make room for the first floor bedrooms, and the ~6" or so of outward spread that had already happened, threatening to cause the rafters to fall in, was enough to make us walk away..............

Edited by JSHarris

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On 5/1/2017 at 10:49, JSHarris said:

That, together with the fact that the ties holding the side walls together at roof level had been removed to make room for the first floor bedrooms, and the ~6" or so of outward spread that had already happened, threatening to cause the rafters to fall in, was enough to make us walk away..............

 

I can never understand this sort of behaviour.  You either know what you're doing, in which case you know how important the ties are, or you don't, in which case surely the appropriate thing is to leave it alone or talk to someone who does know what they're doing?  Why would anyone take this sort of risk with their lives?

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26 minutes ago, jack said:

 

I can never understand this sort of behaviour.  You either know what you're doing, in which case you know how important the ties are, or you don't, in which case surely the appropriate thing is to leave it alone or talk to someone who does know what they're doing?  Why would anyone take this sort of risk with their lives?

 

As far as I could find out at the time, the conversion was done very much on the cheap by a local jobbing builder, who bought the chapel at auction and then converted it.  He didn't raise the garden, that was done by the young couple that bought it from the builder, without them realising that raising the ground a couple of feet above the floor level and blocking off the vents was going to cause such a massive problem.

 

The remedial work recommended for the roof was to strip it right off, cast a concrete ring around the top of the walls and install steel tie bars across the walls to help prevent any further spread.  The roof would then be replaced with a steel ridge beam and hung rafters.  Together with ripping out and replacing the floor, and digging out the soil alongside the wall, it was likely to cost more than had been spent on the original conversion.

 

The risk must have been known to the vendors, as they had already told us that "there were a few loose slates that needed attending to".  The loose slates were a consequence of all the movement that had already taken place in the roof, as the rafters had spread, pushing the walls apart.

 

The daft thing is that it would have been easy to fit steel ties to keep the walls in place, as the bedrooms and bathroom were at either end, as mezzanine-like first floors, with the living room being in the centre with a full height vaulted ceiling in the central part.  Most of the ties could have been hidden in the first floor sections, with maybe a couple of unobtrusive steel bars running high above the living room.

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54 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

As far as I could find out at the time, the conversion was done very much on the cheap by a local jobbing builder, who bought the chapel at auction and then converted it.  

 

So the first type then, who should have known what the ties were for.  Mind-boggling.

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I walked away from a similar build a couple of years ago - the "architect" advised that the ties could be removed and lifted by 4-6ft to create headroom .... I asked if they needed to be modified and I was told no....

 

We looked at an alternative solution using a steel frame inside the building but it just became uneconomic ..!

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Patio Doors going in.

 

That pile of bricks illustrates how many bricks come out of a hole 40% of that size.

 

IMG_0418-s.jpg.8104bf23c98799443d9a82c36ad0fce6.jpg

Edited by Ferdinand

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After a break...

 

I have obtained an EPC Report, as we will be finishing in mid-December. The provisional EPC will be roughly a 76 in Band C.

 

That seems OK for a renovation of a 1966 bungalow that was around a 46 EPC before we started.

 

Ferdinand

 

Edited by Ferdinand

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