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Ferdinand

Little Brown Bungalow

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I will be buying a small semi detached 1970-ish bungalow, which will need a full refurb.

 

This thread is for questions and answers about the renovation.

 

Note that the full frontal pic is a different bungalow from the area with a better pic.

 

On the floor plan North is at about 11 O Clock, ie the car port faces South of South West.

 

The rather interesting two doors into the lounge at the top are left from when it was two rooms, and there is now an arch between the two to make them one. 

 

I can't post the EPC because it is not back yet; the sale was agreed within 24 hours of the advert.

 

Ferdinand

 

 

 

floor-plan.jpg

similar-pic.jpg

Edited by Ferdinand

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What are your intentions with it? Let, sell on, live in?

 

I would be tempted to reinstate the missing partition and make that room into two bedroom, then turn one of the existing bedrooms into the living room, seeing as it is adjacent to the kitchen.

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My immediate thought is the "front" room that gets most of the sun is wasted as a bedroom. Is that big enough to be a living room then as above divide the existing living room to be two bedrooms?
 

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The price was good so I can do either. As a single family let it would deliver a good yield - excellent for a bungalow, and the area is likely to improve over time. I am probably tempted to make it a rental. As a rental I would make the insulation etc higher quality and more, and sort ventilation etc more thoroughly. I would keep costs tighter for a sale and sell in say March.

 

On layout a key challenge is that the sun is on the road side not the garden side, which is unfortunate but is life. They need to be the same. The front bedroom was previously the lounge, so is large enough. It is quite a surprise that it has 3 compact but suitable doubles. The basic design from 1970 is quite efficient. It could easily be a small professional HMO for 2 or 3, when the main issue would be street parking.

 

I think the optimal arrangement for living is 2 bedrooms at the back, one with patio doors so it can be Bedroom, Living 2, Playroom or Workroom/study if desired, and to perhaps combine the kitchen and lounge into one and possibly losing the side door.

 

The kitchen/lounge idea may not be justifiable. There is not much on that wall though, so may only cost a couple of thousand to open up. OTOH there is plenty of space in the kitchen for a breakfast bar, using the walkway to the door as the place for the two bar stools when in use.

 

There is a whole variety of treatments of the car port in the road. Some have made garages, some conservatories up to the front wall line, and other something which makes 75% of the car port into a conservatory or vestibule. I think the third option is best as the others spoil the face of the building. Need to think about structure and what to design the room to be.

 

Ferdinand

Edited by Ferdinand

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The "sun on the road side" has always been a big issue of mine.  When I bought my first house I faced the difficult decision (it was a new estate so I had choice of which one to buy) of buy the one with the sunny garden and living room that backs onto a road so might be noisy, or buy one at the end of the cul-de-sac with a north facing garden and living room.


 

Thankfully last and present new build have had the sun in the back garden and of course that is where the living rooms have been designed to be.


 

 

The absence of sun into the back rooms would probably make a good summerhouse at the bottom of the garden a worthwhile thing, to make full use of the garden with sunny room to go with it.

 

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Reactivating this thread.

 

After a lot of flipping and flapping this purchase has now completed. Next project underway :-) .

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Was down there yesterday taking a few "before" pics

 

Nice face. Weedkiller indicated before the dandelions get to seed. Both DG untis are blown. The panel under the window is just insulated plastic. Most in the road have been done with Tyrolean, brick cladding or mini oriel bays (a slight extravagance imo).

 

img_0031_small.thumb.jpg.6e1c5073c05782b334b0aeb351ac7885.jpg

 

Potential soffit / carport junction problems.

 

img_0027_small.thumb.jpg.067dc6adf5554acecc7cf343493f8cc0.jpg

 

 

Sagging car port. Possible cause for some damp inside a coupe of rooms. 1st job.  Car port roof is single piece with next door, so first to clean / remount.img_0028_small.thumb.jpg.61e920d2ec3a834b441c8fd5788ffabb.jpg

 

Door inside car port to be replaced.

img_0030_small.thumb.jpg.a14738a8839778298c02dc8de842b00e.jpg

 

New consumer unit required.

 

img_0013_small.thumb.jpg.53cd0689f9adab37c72b1747a43fad38.jpg

 

Cork wall. Memories of 1970s. That plank where the wall used to be is very springy.

img_0001_small.thumb.jpg.bf2d2ac87181ea80477755f3aadf7513.jpg

 

 

Patio doors to go in where the window is. Two rooms to be redivided. that gas stove has a pipe running all the way round the outside.

img_0004_small.thumb.jpg.a84adaf38d3cdacba0a566c229e78277.jpg

 

 

Water cyclinder and back boiler. Will be going for combi.

img_0008_small.thumb.jpg.e12e3bbc3c3a3f278bdcf245c93f031f.jpg

 

 

Somewhat dated kitchen. Gut / replace. Some previous leaks - kitchen may require new floor.

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IMG_0220.JPG

Edited by Ferdinand

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The initial plan is full IWI.

 

But I am just musing about doing EWI on it. I had ruled that out because of the semi-detached nature of it, but there is a wall down the middle of the car port and apart from that front gable the roof if fully hipped.

 

That sounds potentially cost-effective.

 

Thoughts welcome.

 

Ferdinand

 

Edited by Ferdinand

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I quite like EWI and the roof overhang looks OK, but the cladding / render may be vulnerable to damage near the car port.

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So I clearly need something on the corner that will damage cars ^_^

Edited by Ferdinand

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13 minutes ago, Ferdinand said:

So I clearly need something on the corner that will damage cars ^_^

 

Sacrificial downpipe ....

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1 minute ago, PeterW said:

 

Sacrificial downpipe ....

 

I would be more tempted by roughcast concrete or a post repair spur :-)

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So a solid object has solid fixings. If you hit a steel post the damage to both vehicle and building will be high - use a deformable UPVC downpipe that is fixed with sacrificial fixings and the damage to both vehicle and building will be low.

 

Downpipes are also very visible and in this circumstance also of use ..!

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10 minutes ago, PeterW said:

So a solid object has solid fixings. If you hit a steel post the damage to both vehicle and building will be high - use a deformable UPVC downpipe that is fixed with sacrificial fixings and the damage to both vehicle and building will be low.

 

Downpipes are also very visible and in this circumstance also of use ..!

 

I was thinking of an attachment to the concrete drive :-).

 

Though even then a Tonka Tank may be problematic.

 

There might also be a case for making the car port more of an outdoor store and keeping cars out, maybe even a gate of sorts.

Edited by Ferdinand

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Lots of developments at the LBB.

 

I have quotes for both uPVC double glazing (which will be reassuringly inexpensive by the sound of it), and EWI (which sounds as if it might be affordable for once).

 

I am going for a full uPVC replacement including both doors, because by the time I had identified all the ones that *had* to be replaced it was about 60%.

 

On the plans above, the layout changes will be:

 

1 - Redivide room where the wall has been removed ==> back to 3 bedroom.

2 - Insert French Doors to rear, which gives the T the option of using that bedroom as a "lounge / study to outside", or to use the front bedroom as a lounge.

 

I already have a (very neatly - I missed it first time) filled 50mm cavity wall, so the EWI will give u-values for the walls of:

 

90mm EPS ==> 0.23

120mm EPS ==> 0.19

180mm EPS ==> 0.15

220mm EPS ==> 0.13

 

For various reasons (mainly width of side path) it will be 90mm or 120mm.

 

It is said that the main thing about EWI is detail ! detail ! detail ! so I will start a thread about EWI questions, which I do not think we have yet, in the Insulation section. I am a little horrified that the gas people seem to want a 75mm clearance round the meter box right through the EWI back to the wall.

 

Ferdinand

 

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Sound insulation.

 

I want to isolate the semi-detached side from the bungalow next door, since I have heard a few noises through the (probably dense-ish block) walls.

 

Can anyone advise on what would be appropriate to provide that little bit extra isolation.

 

The current plan is to board out with 63mm CLS and 12.5mm plasterboard, and fill the void with rockwool - perhaps 70mm or 100mm rockwool compressed a little.

 

Would that be of much benefit?

 

Cheers

 

Ferdinand

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On 15/04/2017 at 09:51, Ferdinand said:

I am a little horrified that the gas people seem to want a 75mm clearance round the meter box right through the EWI back to the wall.

 

Must it be free space or can it be filled with something flameproof like rockwool?

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47 minutes ago, jack said:

 

Must it be free space or can it be filled with something flameproof like rockwool?

 

Not sure on that one.

 

Currently my ewi quote is in at £125 inc VAT per sqm for 90mm of EPS as the core so I am revisiting DIY.

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2 hours ago, Ferdinand said:

Sound insulation.

 

I want to isolate the semi-detached side from the bungalow next door, since I have heard a few noises through the (probably dense-ish block) walls.

 

Can anyone advise on what would be appropriate to provide that little bit extra isolation.

 

The current plan is to board out with 63mm CLS and 12.5mm plasterboard, and fill the void with rockwool - perhaps 70mm or 100mm rockwool compressed a little.

 

Would that be of much benefit?

 

Cheers

 

Ferdinand

 

I scored some 10'x5' "blue" plasterboards from site that are 15 or 16mm thick. On the wall I used it on NOTHING gets through sound wise. It's on 2"x2" battens with Rockwool batts in between.

 

EDIT: Wish I'd done it my first house as the neighbours used to be vocal whilst...... ;)

Edited by Onoff

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We did 3x2 battens stepped off the wall by 1" Filled with proper sound insulation and then two layers of 12.5mm PB.  Gunked the lot where it joined walls. No noise at all.  Result.

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58 minutes ago, Ferdinand said:

@Onoff

 

Did you do it 2 layer?

 

F

 

One layer but I didn't know any better! Where I packed the battens off the wall slightly I gun foamed behind.

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13 minutes ago, CC45 said:

We did 3x2 battens stepped off the wall by 1" Filled with proper sound insulation and then two layers of 12.5mm PB.  Gunked the lot where it joined walls. No noise at all.  Result.

 

Could you explain how you stepped them off the wall? Was that just with blocks or battens?

 

Thanks.

 

 

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Fixed them top and bottom and then packed with some timber at around 600mm centres - 3 bits (smallest I felt comfortable with) per vertical length so each timber was fixed in 5 places.  Noggins in between them at 400 centres.  It felt solid. Wish we had done the other dividing walls as well.  The quality sound proof insulation was damn expensive.

 

Did try to find pics for you but proving elusive at the minute.

 

Cc

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