ProDave

Boiling Water taps. What and where to buy.

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agree with Nick. I've seen autoclaves discharging steam from 121+ degrees into bog-standard waste pipe. A couple of minutes is fine, but then energy of a continued discharge is very different to a small volume for a short time.

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Over budget but we have Zip Hydrotaps at work (they're £££) and this is the reason for the temperature being below 100C on their website (but they can be adjusted):

 

Quote

The HydroTap is set to dispense water at 98ºC.

This is for the following reasons:

  • To achieve WRAS approval, you can’t dispense water above 98ºC for safety and energy efficiency
  • Keeping water at 98ºC reduces power consumption compared to 100ºC models
  • A smooth stream of water emerged from the tap
  • as opposed to a mix of steam and water – it doesn’t splash or spit.
  • Tea and coffee benefits hugely in terms of flavour when water is dispensed slightly below 100ºC. In fact, pouring 100ºC water onto tea and coffee burns them, impairing the taste.

The HydroTap does offer the option to adjust the boiling temperature via the under-counter command centre.

 

 

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All of this seems like a convenient way to say our product doesnt meet the standard set by the market leader but we have some excuses to justify our shortcoming.

 

Its like saying I dont run as fast as Usain Bolt but I consume less energy as well and I am cheaper to sponsor.

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My next question is connecting the tundish discharge.

 

I have a 2 bowl waste kit very much like this one https://www.screwfix.com/p/floplast-double-bowl-sink-trap-kit-white-40mm/80588

 

It connects the two sink bowls and has ONE point to connect an appliance, currently used by the dishwasher.

 

The MI for the HW tap says to connect the tundish via a bit of hose to an appliance connector.

 

So todays question, is HOW to add a second appliance connector to that sink waste set, OR can someone point me to a dual bowl sink waste kit that has TWO appliance connector points?  (I need to buy one for the utility room, so the one I have could move to the utility room if I buy a new one for the kitchen)

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3 minutes ago, ProDave said:

It connects the two sink bowls and has ONE point to connect an appliance, currently used by the dishwasher.

 

The MI for the HW tap says to connect the tundish via a bit of hose to an appliance connector.

 

So todays question, is HOW to add a second appliance connector to that sink waste set, OR can someone point me to a dual bowl sink waste kit that has TWO appliance connector points?  (I need to buy one for the utility room, so the one I have could move to the utility room if I buy a new one for the kitchen)


McAlpine WM11 one has two appliance connectors. 


https://www.wickes.co.uk/McAlpine-WM11-Sink-P-Trap+Twin-Nozzles---38mm/p/226994
 

Not a fan of the Floplast one you linked as the horizontal run from the second sink can collect crud, dry out and start to smell. Much better to put a pair of traps on - usually works out cheaper too - so you can keep using one if the other blocks or needs cleaning out. 

 

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Our tap came with a tee and fitting to connect the tundish outlet to the waste pipe:

 

P1010847.thumb.JPG.888a33bbcc81d5d2abee6400c27b4b26.JPG

 

The parts look like standard 1 1/2" compression waste fittings to me.

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30 minutes ago, JSHarris said:

Our tap came with a tee and fitting to connect the tundish outlet to the waste pipe:

 

P1010847.thumb.JPG.888a33bbcc81d5d2abee6400c27b4b26.JPG

 

The parts look like standard 1 1/2" compression waste fittings to me.


@JSHarris that is a compression overflow tee connector. Neat way to install it. 

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This is the waste I have in use at the moment

sink_waste.thumb.jpg.f291da23cac6455919b0377e5981f045.jpg

I could add the in line adaptor either in the horizontal section from the left hand bowl, or in the vertical section above the trap.

 

Set up this way, the main larger sink is the left hand one so that horizontal section of pipe gets plenty of flow so should stay sweet.  It is the vertical drop from the half bowl that gets less use.

 

This is the standard 2 bowl sink waste that Howdens supply.  This is presently connected to a temporary sink that will be moving to the utility room.  When we do the boiling water tap it will be part of finishing the kitchen involving a new sink and a stone worktop, plus the boiling water tap.

 

I need another waste.  I could move this one with the sink to the utility room if a more appropriate one with 2 appliance wastes was available.

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A self-cutting adaptor on the vertical section above the trap? BES 6957 or similar...

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In the end I chose the Lamona one from Howdens.  It arrived yesterday with all my utility room kitchen units.

 

It is actually made by and badged as Redring.

 

I find the way it is piped a little strange.  There are FOUR hoses connected to the tap. I was only expecting three.  The 4th one is mains cold out to feed the water boiler.  I really wasn't expecting that, it makes the tap connections unecessarilly congested.  It also makes the extra cold water branch I had already made, with ballofix valve already in place to feed the boiling water tank redundant.

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means the tank is unpressurised, it vents through the tap. Our Brita filtertap is the same...

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8 hours ago, ProDave said:

[...]

It also makes the extra cold water branch I had already made, with ballofix valve already in place to feed the boiling water tank redundant.

 

Well Dave, that's the cost of intelligent planning ... can't get the staff these days squire ....

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1 hour ago, dpmiller said:

means the tank is unpressurised, it vents through the tap. Our Brita filtertap is the same...

So why does it have a pressure relief valve discharging through a tundish?

 

I will have to connect the tap hoses and investigate but my understanding is the "cold water to the tank" is a direct connection from the cold water in.  I will check later and confirm.

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29 minutes ago, ProDave said:

So why does it have a pressure relief valve discharging through a tundish?

 

Is there an NRV on the cold feed to the tank to stop heated water flowing back out of the cold tap? Without an NRV it wouldn't in normal operation but might if, say, the cold supply was turned off.

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Okay I have fitted the hoses and it all makes sense now.

 

The "boiling water" tap turns on the cold feed to the boiler tank.  The output from the boiler tank goes direct to the spout with no valves.  So it works by the cold water displacing the boiled water and forcing it out of the spout, not by the tap interupting the flow of boiling water.

 

It does beg the question why the blow off valve and tundish? I assume to protect against a blocked spout?

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When i used to fit posh kitchens, i used to fit loads of "boiling water taps". Perring and Rowe, Franke, and Quoker. All of them were always fitted to a hard cold water supply with the correct filter fitted. Being the South East, the boiler boxes tended to last to just outside the 2 year g/tee. When you compare them side by side, the Quooker was by far the best, but at a price. They might be great in a soft water area, but if you are in a very hard water area, don't bother. Buy a £10 kettle and sling it after a couple of years.

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Thankfully we have lovely tasting soft water up here. Not a jot of scale in the kettle after 10 years.

 

It would be a different matter if we were on a borehole here as that would be very hard water indeed there is a vein of limestone beneath us.  But thankfully our mains water is derived from a mountain loch about 12 miles away so it's really just freshly collected rainwater.

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On 25/10/2019 at 16:35, Jeremy Harris said:

 

 

Ours definitely delivers water at 100°C, it's marked "100°C" next to the boiling tap handle, and the spec for the boilers states that it runs at 105°C.  It doesn't seem to have any connection with Quooker AFAICS, so I'm not convinced that it's only the Quooker units that can deliver water this hot.

P1010845.thumb.JPG.267d0bb3a1fa98fe88d47e2907c05681.JPG

It's a mixed blessing having water at 100°C coming out.  I've had to adjust the flow rate, using the built-in valve under the sink, to try and reduce the amount of spitting from the tap.  Even so, you need to hold the cup or pan close to the tap, as the water starts to actually boil as the pressure drops as it leaves the spout.  It's still really handy, having boiling water on demand, but it does need a bit of care to not get scalded by splashes.  The safety feature that's built in, that means a spring loaded button has to be held in to allow the boiling tap handle to turn, doesn't help, as it takes a while to get the knack of doing this whilst holding the cup or pan high up under the nozzle.  Let the cup or pan drop a bit, and there's a risk of getting splashed with boiling water.


The point re spitting is a very valid. I’ve got the Quooker and it’s absolutely fantastic and I wouldn’t go back to a kettle. But, it does have its limitations. Two examples are:

 

1. it’s pretty much impossible to fill a plastic pot such as an instant porridge. The reality is that the plastic pot gets too hot to handle and hold it by the rim which doesn’t get so hot and you’ll get burnt from the splashing. 
 

2. Filling a 4 cup tea pot (as an example) needs strong wrists. I can manage fine but my Mum in her 70’s struggles. 

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15 minutes ago, Barney12 said:


The point re spitting is a very valid. I’ve got the Quooker and it’s absolutely fantastic and I wouldn’t go back to a kettle. But, it does have its limitations. Two examples are:

 

1. it’s pretty much impossible to fill a plastic pot such as an instant porridge. The reality is that the plastic pot gets too hot to handle and hold it by the rim which doesn’t get so hot and you’ll get burnt from the splashing. 
 

2. Filling a 4 cup tea pot (as an example) needs strong wrists. I can manage fine but my Mum in her 70’s struggles. 

Is it good for scalding naughty children?

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Next puzzle.  I have read and re read the instalation instructions, and nowhere does it state the hole size needed in the worktop to mount the tap.

 

I guess I will drill a few different sized holes in some bits of wood and see what fits best........

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5 minutes ago, ProDave said:

Next puzzle.  I have read and re read the instalation instructions, and nowhere does it state the hole size needed in the worktop to mount the tap.

 

I guess I will drill a few different sized holes in some bits of wood and see what fits best........

If it's a combined Hot, Cold, and Boiling it will be prob 32mm. I have always done 35mm as the bottom plate of the tap covers the hole, and allows a bit of wiggle room.

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35mm for the combined tap and 32mm for the dedicated tap but they provide a plate to cover larger holes.

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My point is when I get the worktop made I want to specify the smallest hole that will work properly. I am not a fan of the very edge of the flange only just covering the hole.  But I don't want to make it too small that should I or a future owner change the tap, they find the hole is too small.

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