epsilonGreedy

Chip in concrete floor beam end, what should be tolerated?

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Is there any industry tolerance standard for how large a chunk can be missing in a concrete beam end before it needs to be replaced. This was transport damage.

 

Most of my my beams are slightly oversized because they are dispatched from stock that is precut in 50mm increments, hence I can chop say 20mm off the end and still maintain a full beam end seat of 95mm.

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Posted (edited)

I think you would be surprised how knocked about they get on a building site, it would need to be very damaged to not be usable. 

Picture. 

Try not to cut them as it’s a ball ache. 

Edited by Russell griffiths
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On 15/08/2019 at 07:09, Russell griffiths said:

like this.

 

 

My chips were at the bottom load bearing point where the beam sits on the footing wall. Anyhow now the beams are installed I have been able to inspect the chips in the relation final installed position the the actual percentage reduction in load bearing seat due to the chips is tiny.

 

Do your beams rest on a mortar + dpc bed?

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15 minutes ago, epsilonGreedy said:

Do your beams rest on a mortar + dpc bed?

 

No, you unroll DPC straight on the top of the sub structure blockwork and beams on top. No mortar.

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19 hours ago, Russell griffiths said:

Just rest on a roll of dpc. 

 

 

On 04/09/2019 at 10:33, Mr Punter said:

 

No, you unroll DPC straight on the top of the sub structure blockwork and beams on top. No mortar.

 

This what we did then after the floor was in and locked with a sharp sand & cement slurry I decided to read the instructions 🙂

 

The instructions say ""beams should be placed on a mortar bedded damp proof course" which seems at odds with standard industry practice. If following that advice I would wait 2 weeks for such a mortar bed to fully harden otherwise there would be a risk of the beams turning the mortar bed to crumble.

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If they say that they mean wet mortar to allow it to settle and bed the imperfections. 

 

Not an approach I’ve seen before 

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51 minutes ago, PeterW said:

If they say that they mean wet mortar to allow it to settle and bed the imperfections. 

 

Not an approach I’ve seen before 

 

I think it would end up a right mess.

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