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Found 8 results

  1. Good morning everyone, Hypothetical scenario I am exploring which very well could become a reality and I was hoping for your thoughts on an idea I had. I admit I have no idea if this is even possible to begin with let alone worth the money or hassle. The New build is in London. In the long run, we definitely want a basement but don't currently have the finances to do the full build with basement, etc. Need to get the shell complete and move in ASAP though as paying for alternative accommodation atm. What if we were to get all the relevant soil surveys done, have all the plans drawn up and spend extra on piling to make the foundations sufficient to support the house and not need underpinning later. Also, have the ground floor installed as if there is a basement beneath it. A few years later, or when finances allow, we dig out the basement from outside without disturbing the rest of the house. Here's a YouTube series of someone digging a basement from outside the home without disturbing it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1LuFYIrUGw&list=PL51J3HlkH-iKNwCCk8krxfiNvLf9cEfyz&index=18&t=417s. If an entry point was planned in advance, we could do the same. Here are some pros and cons I can think off, if it were possible: Cons: The total cost would be more as the eventual excavation would take longer and be more tedious. The piling could/would cost more than digging the basement first and then using concrete strip foundations and reinforced retaining walls If you dig basement first, you can make a continuous retaining wall with waterproof concrete and then potentially not need a drainage system. If you retroactively do the basement, does that mean you can't make such a wall and would unavoidably need the drainage? Doing the basement later would mean the walls would be thicker in total (piles+walls) making the internal area smaller. If there are unforeseen issues in the basement build, much harder and more expensive to remedy. Pros: Cuts the time until moving in to the house, hence saving money on alternative accommodation (which would offset extra cost) Once moved in to the house, it should be much easier to oversee work, improve quality assurance and do more DIY (again hopefully offsetting extra costs) Much less likely for the project to stop mid-way due to funds running out. Once all is said and done, more money has been spent on the actual fabric of the house. Piled foundations and a basement drainage system, although more costly, provide more peace of mind and longevity? Allows time to save up or arrange alternative funding (loan, etc.) for the basement. Will appreciate comments and thoughts on the above in terms of feasibility, costs, more pros and cons, etc.
  2. Hi, We have full planning and we have been obtaining quotes for the build. We are looking at ICF and the plot is on a slope, with the lower area being flood zone 2. Two of the companies have asked why we did not go for a basement as the below would not be a problem. We did have an FRA as part of the planning app and it said : RECOMMENDATIONS This report assesses that the development is located in Flood Zone 2 and 3. Therefore, as the site has a high risk of flooding. A number of recommendations can be made which may lower the risk or consequence of flooding. The key recommendations of this report are: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A raised threshold should be included within the design, consideration must be given to raise above 15.71m AOD to mitigate against residual risk e.g. surface water routing through the site and uncertainty with the EA modelled flood levels. Avoid the construction of basements due to the proximity of the river unless a suitable design has been met to passively exclude ground water, to the satisfaction of the EA. Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDs) should be considered for incorporation into the design where feasible and the final proposal should ensure no increase in surface water runoff. Due to risk residents and those responsible for the development should be encouraged to sign up to the EA’s FloodLine Service so they are made aware of river levels. How would we find out if this would be possible? Could we submit a Planning - Non material amendment for a basement? If it's rejected would we lose the full planning? Thank you,
  3. Hi, We're about to start our project - 250m² 1.5 story house with basement on a sloping site in Holywood, Co. Down. Drawings all done, just waiting for planning to come through. My background is an engineer/project manager in the water industry, so I'm planning on using a lot of innovative, rapid, and non-traditional construction methods - focus on safe, rapid construction and simplicity and reduced dependence on trades. We're also aiming for passive levels of insulation and airtightness - south facing site with lots of glass. So, expect lots of posts about insulated foundations, ICF systems, tanking, shuttering concrete walls, floor deck systems, MVHR, the lot! Thanks.
  4. Hello Building hasnt started yet, the idea of a basement is becoming more appealing by the moment. It would not extend beyond the walls of the house, but would give some extra space, and I assume this is the best time to do it. Anyone have any advice? I am worried about leakage but a subcontactor I have spoken to is very confident. I know, how long is a piece of string, how much extra is it likely to add on to the build? Thank you in advance
  5. Can anyone recommend a contractor with ideally a specialism in or at very least a great amount of experience in basement construction? I'm looking for someone who can serve the East Herts area. I'm currently dealing with a structural engineer who has drawn up plans which I'd ideally like independently reviewed and potentially I'd also be interested in receiving quotes for excavating and constructing the basement. So even if you know of someone good who may not be local to the Herts area, if they are prepared to carry out the review remotely, that would still be a great help. Many thanks.
  6. Our contractors effectively treated the EPS slab as if it was level ground (i.e. they ignored it) and built their traditional steel lattice & formwork / shuttering on top. Slab and a 100mm kicker first and then built off this as they did the walls in sections. The kicker is necessary to hold the vertical formwork straight on the slab. Water bar on every join (inspected by the Sika rep) and Sika additive in the concrete as this was our sole waterproofing method. I don't think any serious concrete crew will entertain EPS upstands for a basement slab as they would get trashed when doing the walls - the formwork they use is very heavy duty and is craned into position for each wall pour. In my mind, EPS formwork only really works for ground level slabs or ICF where traditional formwork is not being used. For a basement you need to use traditional formwork and apply the EPS to the cast walls afterwards.
  7. I'm re-creating a few threads from e-build where I shared experience of building my 'passive' basement, useful starting points for follow on discussions --------- The original poster was enquiring about waterproofing basements and dealing with the conflicting advice from architect and contractors. My reply: Unless you're 'in the water', which your ground investigation will reveal, warrantied waterproof concrete on its own should be sufficient.We're on undulating layers of clay, lynch hill gravel and seaford chalk so relatively free draining and don't hit water until 6m. Basement excavation was 3.5m so we went for 300mm waterproofed concrete with a land drain around the slab base to a 5m deep soakaway and a 1m wide clean stone backfill.We used an approved Sika contractor and had regular inspections from Sika during the pour, checking water bar placement, penetrations etc. We now have their 15 year insurance backed warranty against water ingress.The overall 10 year build warranty (from Ark) was satisfied by this as were BC.We have friends nearby who built close by the Thames and their basement is half submerged in ground water - they used Glatthar and were very satisfied but it wasn't cheap.We did our entire 122m2 basement for £120k with a single contractor which included demo & cart-away of existing building, excavation & muckaway and the construction of the basement itself - plus all services (fouls, rainwater, water, gas & BT duct & electric). I sourced the under slab & wall insulation separately as they weren't familiar with it at the time.Glatthar wanted about £100k for just the basement construction and we would have had to fund the groundworks separately - which would have been at least half as much again.We also designed our basement as an 'open box' with no structural internal walls so we are free to change the layout if we wish, currently having it framed out which is only costing a few £100 in labour and timber.Good luck, lots FUD surrounding basements and many of the contractors push their preferred systems (typically with additional cost) in a take it or leave it fashion but get what works best for your site and gives you the necessary peace of mind and suits your pocket.
  8. Hello all, as complete newbies, we started our Berkshire build last August after over a year of devouring e-build for advice. We're a fairly standard MBC passive house above ground with a passive basement below which is apparently a first. Now at the plastering stage so plenty of experience under our belt to share and still plenty of advice required! It's good to be back, Mumsnet was not doing it for me.