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Showing content with the highest reputation on 30/05/20 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Never seen these but they are a good idea. Without checking the details myself, do they com3 in different s dims? 85mm is shallow once tiled. I made my own (marmot and orbry board) Openings with tile sizes in mind to try and limit cut edges and to fit mosaics. I did hav3 the luxury of a large cavity
  2. 2 points
    We planted a lot of herbs as plug plants last year and they’ve really grown well. We had a mixture of culinary, and flowering types for the pollinators. We also planted a prostrate rosemary in a pot which is supposed to trail but ours is resisting at the moment. Hopefully gravity will take over soon. We also took some cuttings from a wild honeysuckle and they are doing well. Wendy’s keen on growing herbs and has parsley, chives, sage, thyme, basil, bergamot, bloody sorrel, tarragon, sweet majoram and lemon verbena. I’m more interested in the flowering herbs. Some like hyssop attract the bees and can be used in cooking.
  3. 2 points
    I have done sleeper retaining walls with C and I section (PFC and UC) structural steel and sleepers slotted between. No trench needed. Sink the steel at least 750mm in the ground and concrete in. Use some terram or similar membrane on the back of the sleepers.
  4. 1 point
    I made some. The inflow to the MVHR should have the lowest flow restriction of any of the ducting. I have 125mm diameter ducting and in order to maximise flow into the unit I used 45 degree bends and a short pipe run. The vent I made was 230mm square and by using a grille and insect screen of that size I got slightly better flow area than the ducting. IIRC I used 2mm or 2.5mm stainless steel woven mesh for the insect screen. Some of the mesh companies give flow rates for their different products.
  5. 1 point
    create a VM using Windows 10 home and see what happens. then if it's rubbish get the cheap PC. that's what I'd do.
  6. 1 point
    lol. still £99 more than you'd need to spend if you can run a VM on the NAS. Windows 10 (home edition) is free so should be ok for your needs, it's just you can't Remote Desktop to it so would have to administer through the console on the VM software. running windows 10 on a VM is a bit of a dog with only 2GB ram but if you can give it some more then you should be ok. give it a go and see what happens! the only thing you'll lose is a bit of time.
  7. 1 point
    What do people consider of these traps? I'd not come across them before until some work in our house, the previous owner had installed one but it seemed to of been jammed up and open. Are there better ones?
  8. 1 point
    I have one on my downstairs shower, because when I added a bath and new shower to the bathroom upstairs last year I started getting some washback into the downstairs shower. F
  9. 1 point
    To answer my own question, my county council has a helpful map where you can check a road's status. It categorises roads as: A Roads B Roads C Roads Unclassified (even the unclassified ones appear to have a number with a U prefix). Looking at the link above it seems a new access onto an unclassified road where you do not need to cross a pavement requires neither planning permission nor highways consent. Even if you are crossing a grass verge owned by the highways authority it seems you do not need their consent to cross it.
  10. 1 point
    All I would add is have a look at prices before you get set on an idea it all looks lovely on the screen but when you come to buy them you wish you had thought of another idea im finding the shiny pictures from an American website im working to are 1. Very expensive. 2. Above my skill set.
  11. 1 point
    Surely these exist as a bodge to "fix" a dodgy drainage system? Properly designed they should not be needed. Would a waterless trap do the same thing?
  12. 1 point
    we've got a retaining wall thats 4 sleepers on their sides deep at the worst point - fence panel on top of it. We dropped some RSJ's in (concrete) 1m+ working an a 1/3 in the ground. Slide sleepers down them. Get someone to bore the holes for you - look up agricultural fencers in your area - they frequently bore holes so should have the kit. They are quick at it and well worth the cost.
  13. 1 point
    So far I've used my arch program's "default pocket door' mode, which simply moves a door into and out of the wall. And my current design roughly fits a 2m50 gap without doing strange things to external walls. But - it seems like there's such a thing as telescopic pocket doors! You learn something every day. Given that I have about 4.8m worth of wall, am I reading this spec sheet correctly, that I can indeed fit 3.1m worth of passage? Not bad... I do like @Jilly's door suggestion (open for more suggestions) but indeed the problem with a single pivot to me seems that to achieve even a 3m gap I'd need 1.5m worth of distance. Not insane but it feels a bit limiting where you can not really move behind the door..
  14. 1 point
    https://www.railwaysleepers.com/blog/tips-advice/how-to-build-a-retaining-wall-with-railway-sleepers
  15. 1 point
    If you haven’t already bought it, avoid that ACV like the plague as they are a nightmare to plumb in and really don’t work that well. Depending on air tightness and uValues you could go UVC but for 3 en-suites it will need to be 400 litres. Alternative is a thermal store that will also take your excess PV but both need good water pressure. Option on the UVC would be fit a small buffer tank too to keep the boiler condensing and not short cycling.
  16. 1 point
    Highland pump centre. That's the retail part of the business, they are also known as commissioning solutions Scotland.
  17. 1 point
    22 to the UVC. 22 from UVC to manifold. 15mm to shower / bath from manifold. 10mm elsewhere. 22 or 28 for the ASHP depending on MIs
  18. 1 point
    Well, Architects are quite happy working in unitless and qualitative measures; see also visual weight of a design, degree of overbearing or overlooking on neighbours, harmony, speaking the local vernacular, feelings of space and light, etc. To be honest the vast majority of the population are also quite tolerant unitless and ill defined measures. It's just in the more obscure corners of the internet you find the folks (some would even say, pedants) that get het up about it
  19. 1 point
    10mm Pipe For Hot Water Taps? (Content copied from EB) Started by Eagerbeaver , 24 Jan 2016 07:56 AM 10 replies to this topic Eagerbeaver Posted 24 January 2016 - 07:56 AM All the water pipe installs I've seen use 15mm pipe but the flow capacity of 15mm is far more than is needed for most hand basins and sinks. The down side of using 15mm for hot water is that you end up with a lot more cold water to shift in the pipe before it runs hot. Is there any problem with using 10mm for hand basins and sinks for the hot water? tonyshouse Posted 24 January 2016 - 09:13 AM For very long runs pressure drop could result in too slow flow, avoiding using elbows will help Would be fine with combi or pressurised system or three storey situation. Nickfromwales Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:21 AM What lengths are the runs? Also, are we talking about a radial plumbing setup ( critical if considering using 10mm runs ). 10mm is perfect for wash hand basins, but kitchen and utility would probably be better with 15mm for short, higher volume draw offs where 10mm may struggle. If there's not a good / very good cold mains pressure / flow rate at the incoming supply then excessively long runs may suffer, Regards, Nick ProDave Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:38 AM I'm considering this. In my new house, the kitchen will have the longest run, about 6 metres. I'm planning to try a 10mm pipe for the kitchen hot water tap to minimise the volume of cold that has to be drawn off before the hot arrives. We have good water pressure and food flow at the source so I think it's worth a try. jsharris Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:38 AM It's commonplace on the continent to see narrow pipe runs to basin taps, not sure if it's usually 10mm or 12mm but it looks a lot smaller than our normal pipe of 15mm. With a decent head 10mm pipe will flow a fair bit of water, more than is usually needed for wash basins or even sink taps, dishwashers etc. For guidance, a 10m long length of 10mm OD copper pipe causes a pressure drop of about 1.7 bar at a flow rate of 10 litres/minute. Sink taps rarely flow at more than 6 litres/minute, 10 litres /minute is about an average mains pressure shower flow rate. What this means is that if you have a head at the start of the pipe of at least 1.7 bar then you can get a flow rate of 10 litres/minute from the open end of a 10 metre length of 10mm OD copper pipe. We have an available head of around 4.5 bar, so I could have used 10mm pipe pretty much everywhere and still had good enough flow rates. The downsides with using small bore pipe is that you pretty much have to use a radial plumbing arrangement, with the pipe from each outlet fed back to a common manifold, you can't really run two or more outlets from a single pipe, as they will interfere with each other to a greater extent than with larger bore pipe with a lower flow resistance. Another downside is that if you try and flow 10 litres/minute through a 10mm OD pipe then it will make a noise, especially if you have a fairly high head of pressure at the manifold. The noise is acceptable at up to around 6 litres/minute, but any more and you need to increase the pipe diameter to quieten it down. For comparison, the pressure drop across 10m of 15mm OD copper pipe is a great deal lower, at around 0.2 bar for 10 litres/minute flow rate. Plastic pipe flow rates are lower, or the pressure drop higher for a given flow rate, because they usually have a smaller bore for the same OD as copper pipes. cjard Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:46 AM I looked a using a range of different pipe sizes but in the end just used 15 mm throughout for the following reasons I'm using plastic, and the bore is a little smaller than copper 15ml so there's a little less volume of wasted water A metre of 15mm plastic holds about 70ml more water than a metre of 10mm, given my longest pipe run from manifold to sink is 5 metres, that's less than a teacup. The longest shower run is 10m but, for the duration a shower runs, the excess is a drop in the ocean Plastic doesn't suck the heat out of the water the same The manifolds are 15mm, and I'd have to adapt down to 10. Plastic fittings at pretty bulky and ugly at the best of times and it adds cost and points of failure Flow capacity isn't the be all and end all. If you rush water through a pipe you can create areas of low pressure where it will boil temporarily and make a horrendous noise. A bigger pipe flows more slowly isn't as prone to this cavitation cjard Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:53 AM ProDave, on 24 January 2016 - 10:38 AM, said: I'm considering this. In my new house, the kitchen will have the longest run, about 6 metres. I'm planning to try a 10mm pipe for the kitchen hot water tap to minimise the volume of cold that has to be drawn off before the hot arrives. We have good water pressure and food flow at the source so I think it's worth a try. Consider an instantaneous heater that will use a little electricity to heat the initial water and then dial back on its output as he hotter water starts arriving. Saves water, maybe saves the planet if you have renewable electricity. Such instant heaters can be good for occasional use households as it beats having a large standing volume of hot water losing heat constantly jsharr Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:57 AM cjard, on 24 January 2016 - 10:46 AM, said: I looked a using a range of different pipe sizes but in the end just used 15 mm throughout for the following reasons I'm using plastic, and the bore is a little smaller than copper 15ml so there's a little less volume of wasted water A metre of 15mm plastic holds about 70ml more water than a metre of 10mm, given my longest pipe run from manifold to sink is 5 metres, that's less than a teacup. The longest shower run is 10m but, for the duration a shower runs, the excess is a drop in the ocean Plastic doesn't suck the heat out of the water the same The manifolds are 15mm, and I'd have to adapt down to 10. Plastic fittings at pretty bulky and ugly at the best of times and it adds cost and points of failure Flow capacity isn't the be all and end all. If you rush water through a pipe you can create areas of low pressure where it will boil temporarily and make a horrendous noise. A bigger pipe flows more slowly isn't as prone to this cavitation I did the same, used 15mm plastic everywhere, for much the same reasons. I did initially try running 10mm copper, but it was far too difficult for me to pull through posijoists on my own and I scrapped two lengths and then gave up and switched to 15mm plastic. Plastic is a hell of a lot cheaper and one roll did the whole house. I'd definitely NOT use 10mm plastic, as the bore is a lot smaller than 10mm copper, and restricted further by the inserts. Nickfromwales Posted 24 January 2016 - 01:10 PM I've ( on a previous job ) used 10mm Hepworth with the slimline stainless steel inserts and the flow rates were more than adequate. Longest run was prob about 13-14m. I used 10mm to each WC purposely to reduce water velocity and stop the WC from over monopolising on the available water pressure ( quite a significant short turn effect on showering when not reinforced with an accumulator ) which gave the desired results, and also reduced the noise of the cisterns filling too. The basin hot and colds were all in 10mm and performed well. Manifold 15mm outlet with a 15x10mm reducer. Hepworth 10mm direct to outlet with zero joints. 10mm exposed behind basin ( out of sight ) terminating into fitting reducers ( female each side ) and then a piece of 15mm copper made off to a male 15mm x 1/2" fitting which the tap connector fits into. Everything else in 15mm, for simplicity ( one size fits all ) more than anything Regards, Nick. ProDave Posted 24 January 2016 - 05:49 PM Sounds like in my case 10mm to the kitchen sink will be okay. It's the only pipe run in this direction and the longest run from the hw tank. All the rest (bathrooms and utility) are the opposite direction and will be more conventional. the bulk of the run will run parallel to one of the posi joists so I will try and run it in a coil of 10mm copper. VIPMan Posted 24 January 2016 - 06:20 PM I've used a 15mm manifold system with 10mm copper to basins. 15mm plastic to bath and shower. Maximum runs around 17metre. Still a work in progress but flows seem reasonable with around 4.5 bar mains pressure.
  20. 0 points
    Can’t help you there! Good luck with your decision.
  21. 0 points
    You can't waste time on this board Karen. It's not easy to drill down to the core message sometimes but mostly a bit of effort repays handsomely. Or you could just PM @Russell griffiths, he knows everything.
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